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Unread 12-07-2010, 08:59 PM   #1
signaturedoc
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Default Faking pain to get drugs

Hi all- I am an internist and HIV specialist in suburban northern Illinois, I have a Waiver to prescribe but only have one patient on Suboxone. I also work at the local hospital in administration. I need your collective advice.

Like probably every hospital, we have patients that we call "frequent flyers" who come to the ED several times a month with 10/10 pain- headache, abdominal pain, back pain, etc. They only get relief with IV Dilaudid and usually get admitted with intractable pain when the ED doc finds no cause for the pain and they ask for more Dilaudid. They sit in the room, getting the drug every 2 or 3 hours, asking the nurse to push it real fast. After the dose, they zone out, only to awaken right before their next dose is due. They get a bunch of tests and all are normal and they go home after 3 days with a prescription for Norco. They also visit the other ED's in the area on a regular basis. Some even have primary care docs who give them prescriptions for pain meds on a regular basis. One patient has had 30+ CT scans of the abdomen for 10/10 pain and he is only 25 years old. A recent patient was exhibiting these behaviors- I was called, reviewed her record, Googled her address and found it was an industrial complex- after confronting her she made several feeble attempts to give me more fake addresses and finally asked to sign out AMA and left the hospital quickly.

My contention is that some (not all) of these patients have narcotic addiction and do not have "true" pain. Their brain "tells" them they have pain so they will get narcotics. I feel we are doing them a disservice by giving them narcotics, just as we do not give alcoholics alcohol when they come into the ED drunk.

I want the ED docs to do a good evaluation, do some labs and if all normal tell them they have no physical cause for their pain and must leave, just as we tell someone with a viral sore throat to go home and rest and use throat lozenges and we do not prescribe antibiotics, even if they ask for it. They can get a referral for drug rehab if they want, but no narcotics.

What do you think? What am I missing? What should we have done to you if you presented to the ED with no findings and demanding drugs? If I am totally wrong, tell me, but understand my problem and help me solve it.

Thanks in advance for your honesty.
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Unread 12-07-2010, 09:50 PM   #2
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signaturedoc~
Well, don't know where to start? A person in active addiction will most likely find somewhere to get their DOC. In my personal experience, I usually would go to an ER when I was on my last resort of places to find what I was looking for. In my case tho, I was usually given something IV for pain and a script for maybe 5 days b/c I've had a spinal fushion, and so if I was to say I fell or thought I reinjured my back, I'd get a referral for an MRI and the meds I was looking for. I suppose in most cases Dr's are able to tell when a patient is just drug seeking, or really in pain. I also think that it's a good thing for more Dr's to become more educated with addiction and everything that comes with it. You can give anyone a referral for rehab and send them out without narcotics, but unless they truly want help, it's not going to matter. I guess from a medical point of view, if you are unable to find anything wrong with them, then sending them out with some NSAID's and no narcotics would be a perfectly exceptable thing to do. But that doesn't mean they aren't going to go down the road, or the next town over to try and get what they're looking for there. I guess in the long run, if you educated the Dr's that work in your ED with behaviors that come with addiction, and make some kind of protocol on how to deal with someone you think is only there to seek drugs, then word may get around that your hospital is probably not a place to go for those people seeking. Someone in active addiction tho, is usually pretty determined and go to any length to get what they're looking for. So while you may be cutting down on those coming into your ED seeking drugs, unless every hospital decided to try this method, they will most likely just find help somewhere else.

I think it'd be great to find other alternatives to offer them. Educational handouts on Suboxone, addiction and the behaviors it comes with, referral info to therapist or people who help with people who have an addiction, things like that. Not everyone will be so welcoming to you trying to offer help, some may even become angry for trying to acuse them of having an addiction problem, BUT you may find the occasional person who really takes the time to listen and learn what you have to offer, and actually take that step to get help. It has to be that person who really wants the help tho!

I don't know if this helped any with your questions. This is just what came to mind when I read your post.
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Unread 12-07-2010, 11:26 PM   #3
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signaturedoc, Your idea of good evaluations and lab work sound good. Medical staff in the ED most likely do not want to accuse a person of having a substance use disorder, people may become angry/hostile. Having a social worker ask a few questions and subtly suggesting what the person is (possibly) attempting is problamatic. The problem, of course, is how do you know for sure they are not in some discomfort? I am kind of surprised that patients are presenting with their pain at a 10/10. That seems overkill and would raise an immediate red flag. Steve

Last edited by stp747; 12-07-2010 at 11:31 PM..
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Unread 12-07-2010, 11:29 PM   #4
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Yes drs need to be educated in addiction and recovering addicts. Its in my file addict and still put the scripts in my face. Did that for 15yrs able to say no till I had a weak moment and gave in. Anyway give them the sub right then & there. If they lie bout last dose and go into w/drawl they wont do that again.
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Unread 12-08-2010, 01:30 PM   #5
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Quote:
posted by tig:I think it'd be great to find other alternatives to offer them. Educational handouts on Suboxone, addiction and the behaviors it comes with, referral info to therapist or people who help with people who have an addiction, things like that. Not everyone will be so welcoming to you trying to offer help, some may even become angry for trying to acuse them of having an addiction problem, BUT you may find the occasional person who really takes the time to listen and learn what you have to offer, and actually take that step to get help. It has to be that person who really wants the help tho!

I agree with tig, getting the educational handouts on Suboxone, and this disease of addiction is a great idea. Education is the key, and as long as the patient wants help they will reach out to you. I'm surprised you only have one patient on sub, there are so many people that need you. Here in Pennsylvania its really hard to get anything from any hospital, there is some kind of data base I believe that have the names of doctor shoppers. When I was coming off methadone and so sick, before my induction to sub, my son took me to the hospital for help and I was sent home with nothing. Its hard to take that first step to get help. So glad you went to the class "THE DISEASE OF ADDICTION 101" I had an intern tell me he didn't go because its a choice not a disease.
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Unread 12-08-2010, 01:42 PM   #6
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Hi Doc,
There is a really wonderful program that may ERs have found helpful in dealing with someone who comes in with a possible or definite substance abuse issue. Check out this link to get more info: http://sbirt.samhsa.gov/
In fact, some level 2 trauma ERs (I'm pretty sure) are required to use a program such as this. Hope this info helps.
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Unread 12-08-2010, 08:52 PM   #7
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thanks all!
Great answers.

I only have one patient by choice so far- I am not listed on the database for doctors- I have so many other duties that my practice is closed to new patients but part of this research is inspiring me to open up for some new ones.

mister- did you fake pain or did you really think you had pain? That is part of what I am trying to figure out- do they know the pain is just a drug-craving response or do they really think something is wrong with them?
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Unread 12-08-2010, 11:06 PM   #8
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signaturedoc, Most of the time there is no pain. People with substance use disorders lie about pain to get painkillers. I don't like to admit it, but i was a master manipulater/actor when it came to getting opiods.Perhaps there is the possibility of psychosomatic complaints? Steve
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Unread 12-09-2010, 02:25 AM   #9
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If the patients are drug seeking because of wd's then there is pain from that.
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Unread 12-09-2010, 02:10 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by signaturedoc View Post
thanks all!
Great answers.

I only have one patient by choice so far- I am not listed on the database for doctors- I have so many other duties that my practice is closed to new patients but part of this research is inspiring me to open up for some new ones.

mister- did you fake pain or did you really think you had pain? That is part of what I am trying to figure out- do they know the pain is just a drug-craving response or do they really think something is wrong with them?
Please doc, think about how many people could use your help, doing this research had to make you think about opening up for some new people. There are just so many people that could benefit from your knowledge, by that I mean you know it's a disease, not a choice and your patients will not be stigmatized by you. That stigma scares some patients away, get some of your fellow interns, sway them here. You just never know. God bless you.
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Unread 12-12-2010, 11:42 AM   #11
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I’d say there are 4 possible situations
  1. Someone in actual pain
  2. Someone in some pain exacerbated by anxiety, stress, depression who finds relief with opioids
  3. Someone not in pain at all, but addicted.
  4. Someone in between some the above

Let me speak to the 3rd one

Someone not in pain at all, but addicted. You might be this person's only link to modern treatments for addiction and this is an opportunity to introduce them to modern addiction treatment. Sending these folks out in withdrawal IMO doesn't help anyone. If they are desperate enough to fake an injury in an ER then they are in crisis. This is a great opportunity to introduce them to buprenorphine right there and then! Most people who are addicted don't want to be, but don't know how to get out of it. They think some long painful inpatient detox is treatment and may have children or other responsibilities that prevent them from doing this not to mention the fear of terrible withdrawal and associated depression. Treating their "pain" with buprenorphine right then introduces them to modern addiction treatment and shows them that the old painful detox method is obsolete. Treating these patients with buprenorphine does not count toward your 30/100 limit. This is true for two reasons and you would determine which one each patient falls into. First, the 3 day rule- you (or any doctor) can administer buprenorphine for up to 3 days to relieve acute withdrawal while permanent treatment is being arranged. Registering a patient on the www.TreatmentMatch.org site counts as arranging permanent treatment. Second, certification isn't required to treat patients for pain with buprenorphine, although it would be wise to have some evidence of a source of the pain. The links below explain the details of both options.

The 3 day rule: http://www.naabt.org/documents/three-day-rule.pdf
Off-label use: http://www.naabt.org/glossary.cfm#O
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Unread 12-14-2010, 11:40 PM   #12
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I agree..and almost wish I fell into that group..But I will have REAL wretching pain for the rest of my life and I am stuck on pain meds...BUT..I'd like to TRY and get off them...after 11 years on fentynal patches..I am just tired of them not working ..I hurt thru them so why be addicted too..Make sense?? The only issue I have with people who fake pain is that it makes it FAR more difficult for doctors to know which of us they are dealing with..I am lucky to have had same doctor for all 11 years of pain meds...Before I found her though I was accused of all types of faking just b/c back then the doctors could not "find anything"...when they finally did..I got relief and had good life on meds for about 8 of the 11 years...Drug company changed formula or something and they have never worked well since. My doctor is scared to increase so I hurt thru the patches every day ..all day...I would rather not live if it has to be this way. I do know one way of determining the people with pain who use meds..from the one's who are abusing. IF a person has real pain and use pain meds..we get our lives back!! The other people in # 3 lose theirs..b/c of abusing...I have never taken ..in 11 years my meds except how I was supposed to. But they just are not strong enough and I have been so tempted to add an extra to see if it stopped the pain. So I agree...those in # three can't be discarded. Any of us could find ourselves there some day...We Can't judge..
thanks for your post..
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Last edited by Bendi; 12-14-2010 at 11:45 PM.. Reason: typos
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Unread 02-22-2011, 10:59 AM   #13
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i used to do that all the time,,i once took a broken toe to 3 er's!,,but now all they have to offer is tramadol!,,plus i was on the list of drug seekers,,but hat was over 7yrs ago before i got on sub,,even had teeth pulled that didnt need pulling for narcotics,, even wished i had a disease that would allow me to get pain meds,,or wished i get hurt at work,,crazy stuff i know,,, but thats where mt head was,
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Unread 02-22-2011, 02:02 PM   #14
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Nice post doctor

I was a pain patient who also faked more pain then I was in at times to get what I needed. I had become dependant on opioids and what worked a month ago did not anymore.

I must chime in that my pain was mostly real and severe. To deny me because I in essense used more then the average person and was dependant, would not serve me well at all. Pain hurts and the depression and anxiety that come with it makes it worse.
We when dependant on opioids must come to our own decision as to when enough is enough and weight the cost/benefit of being both out of pain and addicted!

I choose a clinicial trial at Columbia called "Bupe for pain patients who do not take opioids exactly as prescribed" to paraphrase.
I used suboxone both to ward off WD's and to help my pain-it worked well. Now i am off all opoids including suboxone by choice. My pain still is tought to live with but I have sub to fall back on if the need arise's.

I feel we must include suboxone or bupe in our pain arsenal. Seems trials are working on this thank God

My two cents-If a patient says it hurts a lot, believe him. An opioid dependant will not be harmed and a person in pain will be helped

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Unread 02-22-2011, 03:12 PM   #15
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Hi Doc,

There are some great suggestions already and I hope they will help in your practice. I never had a problem getting meds and really thought my pain was real. 10 years ago I did have a 6-7mm bulging disc in my lower back and used that to get lots of meds. But when they asked how bad my pain was I was not stupid and answered 6-8 so it would be believable.

When someone is out of meds and is in a panic, they will do most anything to avoid withdrawals. Even robbing a pharmacy was in my mind a few times, but I'm too chicken to do that.

It sounds like you are on the right path and I applaud you trying to help, but there is no concrete answer. You can tell them about Suboxone but it's not for everyone as it is a very powerful narcotic.

All I can say is Good Luck. Addicts are the worst to deal with concerning the truth.
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Unread 02-22-2011, 11:15 PM   #16
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Hi Doc, so many people who are addicted use the ER as a last resort to get more pain meds. They would rather buy them on the street at $6-10 a pill than go to the ER to fake pain, but -let me say this, there is real pain associated with withdrawal, and it truly hurts very badly, I have been there. Look for flu symptoms with these people, a person in moderate to severe withdrawal will be sneezing, have a runny nose, achy joints, diarrhea, tremors and hot/cold flashes... but it is an addiction, not a health problem or "hurt back". The worst part of withdrawal is depression, so that's another sign. I would guess that most of the pts you see are addicted, but the ones that are not may suffer because of addicts, so it's a tough call on every pt. The opiod screening sounds like a great idea, then you would know hom much a person has in there system if any. I have a brother that every time he runs out he goes to the ER with extremely high blood pressure - which he has-and tells them that he is in pain -which makes his BP go up, he gets injections of some pain med, they get his BP under control and he goes home with an rx for 10-12 pills for post op pain. He has a back problem which is being treated by another physician. They finally caught on to his game and refused to see him anymore!! Also people will fake a police report for stolen meds so that they can get a shot at the ER since they are out of their meds.
I really like that idea of having Suboxone right there, then if a person lies about when they used last and goes into withdrawal, well they asked for it, but then you might be liable for that, I don't know the answer in screening all people, my best advice is to go by your gut feeling, you can usually tell the truthful ones from the untruthful ones. Since my addiction I can pick them out pretty easy, I work in a dental office and so many will say, well I can take this, but I cannot take this...and of course the one they can take is the stronger of all of them. They also fake a toothache when there is nothing on x-ray that shows any reason for that tooth to be hurting. So many lies to get their drug of choice, but how to determine who is honest can be tough, I wish you all the luck in your trials coming. I truly wish more physicians were educated on addiction, it has been such an eye opener for me and i hate the stigma that comes with it. I will say that it started by choice, but wound up being an addiction which I could not control, disregarding my health, my family, my job, my finances...it takes everything away that a person once had control of.
The best of luck to you and all the other "Docs" out there!! Jamielee
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Unread 02-22-2011, 11:20 PM   #17
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Doc, there is real pain associated with withdrawal, but it is the drug talking to the body causing the pain. I have been there, it hurts terribly. Your whole body hurts! It is not psychosomatic, it hurts and only an opioid will take the pain away, or Suboxone!
I posted a different response at the bottom of this page, just had to put this one here!
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Unread 02-23-2011, 02:07 PM   #18
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As I said-doctors must de-detoxify the minds of the DEA and begin using it for pain in patients who have addiction issues as well as real pain.

I've seen trials of bupe for knee pain so I believe the road is being laid to admit bupe into the pain arsenal.

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Unread 02-23-2011, 03:30 PM   #19
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You have an almost impossible job of knowin who's for real and who's drug seeking,,,,I already spoke of my drug seeking ways yrs ago,,but check this out,,itried to kick start my bike and instantly hit the ground in tremendous pain. I couldnt walk and didnt want to call 911 which i should have,,but instead dragged myself around the house for two days on my butt with injured leg on top of other one, Finally ny daughter brought me some crutches and i went to ER,,they they did absolutely nothing and told me to go home and take tylenol.
Now i know im on their sh$t list but that was over 7yrs ago,,ive been on sub 7yrs and dont use opiates,,
Anyway,,i went to my regular doctor and told him what happened and he became livid,,cause he know's how well ive been doin on sub,,and he sent me back to hospital where x-rays showed three fractured bones in my leg,,not counting torn ligaments!
My regular doc gave me opiates but they didnt work cause of the sub,,by the time they wouldve worked ,,they were gone,,but thats ok,,cause he put a brace on my leg and it did wonders for the pain,,that brace helped more than any drug,,,so thats the stuff we addicts go through when we really are hurt and in pain.

I even ask my doctor if he would consider prescribing sub,,,cause i live in a small town,,(5,000 pop),,and most of the drugs on the street come from the doctors office,,,anyway he said he would talk to the higher ups about it. So next time i see him ,,he said they said no cause they didnt want their waitin room full of addicts!!!,,Ha!,,I told him he already had a waitin room full of addicts!!,,they just dont look like addicts,,,more like soccer moms,,,but those same soccer moms are the ones selling their drugs on the street!
So yea,,you have a very hard job of knowin who's an addict and who aint, there is one thing that ALL doctors should do once they find an addict,,and not get mad and just cut them off cold turkey,,like a,lot if not all do,,but make a taper plan and help that person get off the drugs. I have been cut off xanax cold turkey and you can have convulsions and die from that kind of treatment. Wd's are not something to be compared to the flu or something,,it's indescribable what wd's feel like,,suicide is always in your mind,,
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Unread 02-23-2011, 07:26 PM   #20
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damn,,was really lookin for some feedback .
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Unread 02-24-2011, 07:08 PM   #21
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TT they cannot make a taper plan.

The DEA see's to that. Sad but true gotta run now sorry so short

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Unread 02-24-2011, 11:39 PM   #22
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I JUST ASK MY DOC TUESDAY AND HE SAYS HE DOES.,,,2MGS EVERY 2 WEEKS.
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Unread 02-25-2011, 04:00 PM   #23
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TT my understanding is here in NY at least, A family doctor or emergency doctor cannot perscribe an opioid to allay the effects of withdrawal. In other words, he can write but must write for the purpose of pain relief or maybe on the outside, an off-lable use.

Detox is limited to a facility that does that.

Maybe wrong but kinda sure

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Unread 02-27-2011, 04:33 PM   #24
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Hey Swan,

Same in California. Also, I think it's a nationwide deal. No opiates to relieve withdrawal, just for pain or, as you note, something off-label. But not for w/ds. (Excepting Sub, of course)

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Unread 03-31-2011, 11:58 PM   #25
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That sure is a tough call, especially for ER or ED Physicians. I know a few addicts that do that quite often, jumping from one ER to the other. And they seem to walk out every time with narcotics. Some of them do have real pain though, but some don't. But there is no test for having real, true pain. Either they are good actors or they are for real. But how can the doctor tell the difference? However, I personally had a horrendous experience one time at the ER. I had blown discs in the cervical spine and was waiting to commit to a reputable orthopedic surgeon, getting 2 professional opinions, because I was not comfortable with the results of my research on the one surgeon. I was put on Workmans' Compensation, which I tried to plead with my employer not to get them involved. I would seek medical help on my own health insurance. Company policy is sign the accident report and there I go. Anyways, workers comp took forever to okay my second opinion and I was in the meantime getting treated with acupuncture and naturopathy with my own money since my insurance covered neither. I was in agony, pain I have never experienced before. I went to the ER after much debate with myself. I explained I was waiting to have surgery and am waiting for confirmation. I was told I was doctor shopping, and I'm just a drug addict and this is not a pharmacy. I was so mortified, I did not know what to say. I was in tears and cried all night. The next day I got angry. You know I am not doctor shopping, I wanted the most reputable surgeon to work on my spine. I didn't want to end up a paraplegic for gosh sakes. It's like when you want the best, most reputable house painter to paint your house or roofers, plumbers. They are professionals and you want the best one. So you get quotes and in your opinion, you choose the one you're most comfortable with. My point is the people that are really injured or in real pain suffer a lot. And judging everyone, is not fair. That experience will stick with me for a long time and left a bad taste in my mouth for a long time towards the medical field. Everybody and every BODY is different and should be treated as a patient individually. I felt like a victim, like I committed a horrible crime. So, there's a thin line there. And I know some people that really want to get off the pain pills and their doctor won't refer them to a doctor to get them off. They keep running out, their tolerance becomes high, so they take more. The doctor fires them and they have to resort to going on the street to get pills. It's a vicious cycle. Then there's suboxone. Which is another story altogether. It all a cash business usually, very expensive, and in my opinion just another opiate substitute for the pain meds they were dependent on for maybe months or years. One of my dear friends was in a near-fatal accident and was left with such a spinal injury and nerve pain and damage, and 3 back surgeries later. She still works as a registered nurse in pain every day. Was prescribed suboxone and was tapered down by her physician and she still went into full-blown withdrawal. So, I don't get it. She had to go back on the suboxone so she can work. It's been 3 years on suboxone, because she cannot take the withdrawal and she has to work. Like I said it just seems like a vicious cycle. I feel sorry for the people that are really in pain every day, they shouldn't be judged. Some patients should have advocates to point them in the right direction. Confused and still don't know the right answer. Interested in hearing other opinions. Thank You.
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Unread 04-27-2011, 12:03 PM   #26
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I'm not sure I see a difference between "real pain" and perceived pain as when you are there it makes little difference to the sufferer. A person in pain needs to be assisted and doctors are(at least in theory) in the business of treating and helping people who are suffering. If a person is in enough misery to go to an ER and deal with all that entails than they are in need of treatment. Being addicted should not be an obsticle in getting help.
It is disgusting to me how politics and politicians have poisoned the field of pain management and put fear into doctors who try to actually do something about this problem. As a country we are in great need of a more humane way of dealing with human frailty. Our prisons are filled with people who should be in recovery programs and contributing to society rather than being a burden and having their lives ruined so some jerk can say he is tough on drugs. Just say no and other slogans will never be anything but an impediment to better more sane drug laws.
Sorry if I am off topic a bit and will get off the soapbox now.
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Unread 08-17-2011, 07:09 AM   #27
deedle
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I got so lucky.the dr that treated me for osteomyelitis
realized he played his part along with my dentist and
of course myself in my massive addiction .he wrote me a RX
of dilaudid just enough to keep withdrawls away
until I found a good suboxone dr
.I'm lucky my dr takes his do no harm oath to heart
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Unread 08-18-2011, 08:33 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KennJ View Post
I'm not sure I see a difference between "real pain" and perceived pain as when you are there it makes little difference to the sufferer. A person in pain needs to be assisted and doctors are(at least in theory) in the business of treating and helping people who are suffering. If a person is in enough misery to go to an ER and deal with all that entails than they are in need of treatment. Being addicted should not be an obsticle in getting help.
It is disgusting to me how politics and politicians have poisoned the field of pain management and put fear into doctors who try to actually do something about this problem. As a country we are in great need of a more humane way of dealing with human frailty. Our prisons are filled with people who should be in recovery programs and contributing to society rather than being a burden and having their lives ruined so some jerk can say he is tough on drugs. Just say no and other slogans will never be anything but an impediment to better more sane drug laws.
Sorry if I am off topic a bit and will get off the soapbox now.


well said
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Unread 06-18-2013, 08:54 PM   #29
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When I was at the height of my addiction I was in actual pain I had been dealing with endometriosis and any doctor I'd ever seen acted like I should just be able to deal. I got tired of trying to go the honest route and payed for them on the street. Once it got worse I would have surgery and it would come back. I couldn't get any relief from ib profin or anything anymore because I was so addicted to painkillers at that point. Then I got pregnant decided I couldn't put my baby through it so I got off of them. I had no pain while pregnant I finally felt relief. But once my child was born I went back to my old problems I realized within three months I couldn't live that life and give my boy a good life. I got on subs and got on the road to recovery. I was shocked to realize advil would really help me now it's all I need for aches and pain. I also got an I. u.d for birth control which slows the growth of the endometriosis which helped out tremendously. I sometimes worry what will happen when I have to take it out? But for now we are happier and healthier. I just couldn't bring my self to go to an E. R. To get drugs, I felt like if they may put me on a list as a seeker or something and I just thought it was too much time and risk to go in and deal with it. Even before I was an addict I got the idea that the men doctors I would see just didn't understand nor care what I was I was going through. It was a combination of the I.U.D fixing the cause of my pain and realizing I had ended up with a problem. But I would have been so devastated of a doc would have suggested I was an addict when I was truelly in pain from an issue I'd suffered with for years with no relief. I once had a doc say we can do the surgery but I can't promise it will help with the pain. I felt like if something may help I should try, and for about six months to a year after the surgery I would feel more comfortable. Sometimes I guess the true pain creates the addiction which intensifies the pain.
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Unread 08-10-2014, 06:38 AM   #30
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I have crohns disease, typically all my blood work comes back normal, except for elevated white blood count, the pain I have gone through is excruciating, the only way to really tell what is going on with my disease is a ct scan, I was given percocet like candy, when all I wanted was for a doc to put me on a treatment plan that actually worked, I have been on 14 different medications, none of them have worked! This went on for a year and a half, I finally told my primary doc that I thought my pain was due to narcotic bowel syndrome & not the crohns, he told me that was nonsense, gave me a script for 180 pills & sent me on my way, in the next year I continually asked for help, explained my fears of getting addicted to the narcotics, and was told each time, I was only dependant not addicted. About a year later I was taking 10-15 pills a day & was getting used to drs giving me dirty judgmental looks because now they classified me as a junkie.
The entire system needs to change!!
When someone comes into the hospital with a legitimate illness, don't just give them pills right away, I know hospitals are busy, but take some time with the patient, yes it's easier to hand out pills, but it's not better, if someone would have actually taken my concerns seriously, instead of just laughing at me I probably wouldn't be in this position, & if some drs would lose the judgmental attitude, it might put some patients at ease & they might admit they have a problem. I knew I had a problem, but no one was willing to help
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