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Unread 04-02-2010, 12:24 PM   #1
TIM
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Default Teeth and opioids

There is a persistent rumor that methadone rots your teeth. I’ve been looking for some study or other evidence about tooth decay and opioids and haven’t found much at all. But in talking with a few experts, opioids especially long acting opioids could increase the risk of tooth decay, here’s why I think so:

Although methadone itself has not been shown to directly cause tooth decay, dry mouth does. Dry mouth limits saliva and prevents it from washing away bacteria. It’s the waste products of the bacteria that is acidic and erodes tooth enamel. Normally saliva washes it away and keeps the acid from sitting on the tooth tool long. Good dental hygiene helps too, but may not be enough. Opioids, all opioids including bupe, can reduce saliva. With short acting opioids like heroin or hydrocodone, there are periods of high opioid levels which suppress saliva production and periods of low opioid levels which allows saliva to flush away bacteria. With long acting opioids however, like bupe or methadone, there isn’t such a high level of opioid-induced saliva suppression but it is constant so there isn’t a period in the day where normal saliva production flushes away bacteria. Extra attention to dental hygiene can minimize this and there some dry mouth products available that claim to protect teeth overnight.

So patients on long-term long acting opioids especially high doses might be wise to pay extra attention to the consequences of dry mouth and take steps to prevent tooth decay. Drinking plenty of water, chewing sugar fee gum or candy can increase saliva. Bupe patients might be at higher than normal risk of dental problems because of the effects of dry mouth and enamel damage from before starting treatment too. I can’t find any studies to confirm this but I think it would be prudent to take extra care.

References:
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/dry-mouth/HA00034
http://www.drymouth.info/consumer/default.asp
http://www.yourdentistryguide.com/dry-mouth/

Dry-mouth mouthwash
http://www.biotene.com/Products/Mouthwash.aspx
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Last edited by EDWARD; 01-04-2011 at 12:21 PM..
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Unread 04-04-2010, 02:03 PM   #2
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Tim -

Thanks for the information. I now consider myself lucky: 35 years on opiates, 29 on methadone, and only four teeth in my mouth have ever had any kind of work done. My gums are in good shape and I am not a young man.

Regards,

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Unread 04-04-2010, 03:44 PM   #3
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thank you, I'm going to take better care of my teeth now. haven't had a cleaning for quite some time now, so thank you again.
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Unread 04-04-2010, 10:25 PM   #4
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I watched a show about methamphetamine addiction and they mentioned "meth mouth", which they said is caused by the dry mouth.

Unfortunately I went from having one cavity in 36yrs(and at least yrly cleanings) to a complete disaster in the last 2 yrs..I have no idea what caused it, but suspect it is related to the dry mouth issue.

On a recent trip to the dentist I was told by him that when you drink coffee, orange juice, acidic things, that you shouldnt brush right after..it causes the enamel to be soft, and can result in actually damaging the enamel..the recommendation is to rinse with mouthwash, after acidic stuff and wait some time to brush.
Also he recommended mouthwash rinse after the sub, and of course daily brushing etc.

I would remind everyone to avoid that dry mouth at all costs..water, water, water..and preventative care..
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Unread 04-05-2010, 09:31 AM   #5
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I think the notion of methadone destroying teeth and bones is one of the more persistent myths. As you pointed out , Tim, I have yet to see any valid evidence that backs this up.
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Unread 04-05-2010, 11:30 AM   #6
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Big difference between methamphetamines and methadone and I dont know about the methamph but I DO KNOW METHADONE REEKED HAVOC ON MY TEETH!
My dentist whole heartedly agrees with me and the doc at the current clinic I go to says it is true(first honest methadone doc about teeth.) I used to take a wisps with me and rinse then use it after I dosed to get it off my teeth, I hear the pills do not act the same as badly, methadone pills I mean
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Unread 07-25-2010, 10:11 AM   #7
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I've been lurking around this site, doctors advice since im clean and dont attend meetings, And as far as this topic goes I dont need scientific proof, when I have seen it with my own eyes.............

I did Oxis for roughly 5-6 years everyday, never once had teeth problem, Then got on METHADONE and within a 3 year period(especially with bad teeth genes, thanks mom shes got bout 50k in her mouth) MY Teeth got so BAD, It took 2 years of dental work to make it all pretty again. Thats when I realized enough was enough switched over to subs now im in the middle of of sub detox due to work complications... mind you Im only 25
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Unread 07-25-2010, 01:45 PM   #8
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This is an easy one. Google "methadone myths" and tons of links appear. Here is one:

"MYTH: Methadone rots your teeth.

Although there is no scientific evidence which fully explains why, heroin addicts have a never-ending craving for sugar that causes them to consume massive amounts of sweets--gum, candy, and especially chocolate. When someone plunges into the deep abyss of addiction, personal hygiene tends to fall by the wayside. Dentist and doctor appointments are no longer a priority, and showering gets fit in to the schedule when it can. The same goes for brushing one's teeth. Everything that used to matter is overshadowed by the great monster of drug addiction, which trumps all, not to mention that heroin is the ultimate pain reliever, masking toothaches and any other oral sensitivities. Because of this, when a person finally begins to take a step in the right direction and starts taking methadone, their dental hygiene is way below average. One of the side-effects of methadone is that it may give you dry mouth, the same as many other medications. This may cause your teeth to produce more plaque, therefore leading to tooth decay and gum disease."


O
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Unread 07-26-2010, 09:14 AM   #9
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Sorry but I saw way too much in my life with this med. to be naive, My mother at one point was a counselor, and she even says her and her colleagues would discuss this all the time. I was never the average Junkie, I always had nice cars cloths clean and shaved tanned up showered every day brushed my teeth, and with my gene for bad enamel, the med ate up my teeth.

Just because some one hasnt scientifically proved it doesnt mean a thing, they laughed at Columbus when he said the world was round, was he wrong????

Lets say a doctor finally comes out of the closet with the TRUTH, then what millions of lawsuits, the GOVERMENT would NEVER let it happen, Do you not remember JFK or MArtin Luther King, if your a threat to their system you will either be silenced or disappear, dont be NAIVE>....
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Unread 07-26-2010, 09:33 AM   #10
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trs031, They've already proven methadone doesn't rot teeth, its dry mouth that does it. While you were on Oxys dry mouth was slowly eroding your enamel. The dry mouth continued while on methadone and finally ate through causing cavities. Had you started with methadone and switched to Oxys, you'd be saying Oxys cause tooth decay. All opiates cause dry mouth, so if you are on any you need to pay attention to this and take precautions.
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Unread 07-26-2010, 10:31 AM   #11
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I wish I could offer more on this than merely my personal feelings and opinions. They are based on some personal experience and experience with others here locally, but, certainly no medical studies or solid medical facts.

I feel that extended opiate use and/or heavy opiate use does or I should say can breakdown what the body produces to keep our teeth healthy and to protect them.

Now I don't know if this is a direct effect onto the teeth themselves (I don't feel it is) or if it is a more broad and combined effect in simply weakening of the body in general and creating issues which are byproducts which lead to this.

Further, I think it also involves greatly each persons genetic makeup. In other words, people who would be genetically prone to healthy teeth issues anyway, it would effect more.

For myself, I have always visited the dentist twice per year, my entire life and I brush twice per day. My teeth have been a ongoing battle since around 2001 and that increased with time. Prior to that, I had very healthy and very strong teeth.

I began taking a opiate in 1999 and began heavy misuse in the later part of 2003.

I do not feel that Suboxone it's self is damaging to the teeth, I think for those who practice good dental hygiene and still have problems, that it is a accumulative effect, carried over from the time in active addiction and Suboxone is merely keeping those issues live!

I think it goes along with what Sub-Z explained about Methadone, that it is not a direct effect, but, the opiate creates other issues and for some, the teeth issue is a byproduct.

Well that's the personal conclusions I have formulated.

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Unread 08-26-2010, 03:53 PM   #12
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In my last year of active addiction my dentist accused me of being anexoric or eating too much sugar. My teeth suffered, I believe from all the throwing up because mostly any time I got really high and I never got a little high, I'd throw up. Of course, I wouldn't brush my teeth after too. It was embarrassing.
Luckily I have prescription tooth taste to preserve my teeth. I already had well over 50 k put into my teeth because of braces and oral surgery. i HAD four cavities just that one visit and I never had one before. I always have drank a lot of water though so that keeps my mouth wet but I am a mouth breather, which does not help.
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Unread 08-26-2010, 04:15 PM   #13
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OMGoddess- Ditto for me. I just had a wake up call with my teeth, as well. I wondered if it was from the Suboxone, as I've noticed some plaque build up, and have never had a cavity before. I wondered if the tablet sitting in my mouth for 20 minutes had an ill effect on my teeth...
I'm sure my opiate abuse didn't help either.
I have an appt on the 9th to go to the dentist.....yikes.
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Unread 08-27-2010, 03:52 PM   #14
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Some people genetically, have very good teeth. Some people, genetically are predisposed to cavities and acidic mouth syndrome.

Opiates never rotted my teeth, meth I either snorted or shot (we didn't smoke it back in the 80's). I went to the "University of Colorado Health Sciences Dental School" for some time for my dental care. The students do a fantastic job. They are being watched and evaluated by a Dental Professor constantly. The last time was 8 years ago. In 8 years, my teeth went to hell. Teeth chipping, rotting, etc., etc. My diet wasn't the best. I brushed my teeth all the time, but my mouth would still be ACIDIC. That is bad. ACT makes a mouthwash for that. And brushing with a toothpaste that has Sodium Bicarbonate (baking soda) and a little Hydrogen Peroxide helps the pH of my mouth. The pH of my mouth is the problem for me.

I'm fixing my teeth now. Usually, two to three visits a month. I'm in the process of fixing the damage I caused to my teeth via my lifestyle.

Now I would like to here someone comment on Fentanyl suckers and Suboxone and how they affect ones teeth? Not opiates.

My doctor at the hospital said Methadone is one of the best pain killers for BONE PAIN. When the bones are in pain and I mean the BONES, methadone treats the pain very well.

I believe that's why when people detox from methadone, they always say, it get's in your bones. My bones are killing me. It makes sense now. I don't think methadone affects the teeth, unless someone has proved that methadone depletes the body of calcium. It's the opiate users lifestyle that ruins the teeth. If an opiate user takes care of their teeth, they probably have good dental health. Not too many opiate abusers take care of their teeth very well. To busy nodding out and smoking to worry about teeth.

Good Karma and LOL

PS. In fact my friend who has used for awhile (10 years) says he doesn't even have a cavity. I couldn't believe it. He barely brushes his teeth. He must have grew up in an area that had plenty of flouride in the water.
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Unread 09-30-2010, 10:35 AM   #15
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Ok well, I NEVER HAD A CAVITY my whole life till I went to the dentist at 20.(mind u I'd been shooting mostly coke, speed,& just really starting out my heroin journey since 16) the 1st thing the dentist said "have u been using drugs?" "no" I said in front of my mom. Well I had 22 cavities!& the last time Id gone to the dentist was at 18. So from 18 to just barely 20, I had 22 cavities. I feel the uppers probably did the most damage. Also ppl who were doing speed would show me how it was affecting their teeth. Some of these ppl were close to my age at the time (17). I'm REALLY hoping this "long acting opiate"-sub- doesn't have any I'll fx on my teeth. Because if it does, they LEGALLY should list it as a side or possible side effect.
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Unread 10-16-2010, 12:57 AM   #16
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i have had alot of issues with my gums and teeth since starting subs four years ago. i didnt put the two together un till recently. I get very dry mouth at night and im sure thats not helping. i sip water through out the night but i have bad receding gums and my fillings have been falling out and teeth breaking. i have been paying extra attention lately to oral care other than the usual. what kind of products are there for people like use who take bupe to keep from getting dry mouth at night?
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Unread 10-18-2010, 01:11 AM   #17
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they are just figuring out the side effects on these drugs. were kinda the guinea pigs. 5 years ago when i went on subs there were only a couple side effects listed and i complained of many to my doc who told me it was not the suboxone lol i knew it was... now years later all those sides are now listed on the drug facts.
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Unread 10-18-2010, 09:01 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anabolic1979 View Post
they are just figuring out the side effects on these drugs. were kinda the guinea pigs. 5 years ago when i went on subs there were only a couple side effects listed and i complained of many to my doc who told me it was not the suboxone lol i knew it was... now years later all those sides are now listed on the drug facts.
Hello anabolic1979. My name is Linda and my husband has severe sleep apnea, and suffers with dry mouth at night also. There is a mouthwash and a spray called biotene that HELPS ALOT and could be the answer you are looking for. It is pleasantly tasting too. I am so angry at myself for not taking better care of my teeth while doing all those opiates, but I take that anger and teach my grandchildren a lesson well learned. Thanks for listening and Welcome.....a friend, Linda
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Unread 10-18-2010, 09:18 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anabolic1979 View Post
they are just figuring out the side effects on these drugs. were kinda the guinea pigs. 5 years ago when i went on subs there were only a couple side effects listed and i complained of many to my doc who told me it was not the suboxone lol i knew it was... now years later all those sides are now listed on the drug facts.
The Suboxone labeling showing side effects has not changed since its release in 2002.

Buprenorphine was first patented over 40 years ago and is among the most studied drugs with over 10,000 published papers. In addition, it is an opioid itself and many of the thousands of opioid studies apply to the knowledge base of buprenorphine too. It’s individuals’ misunderstandings that plague buprenorphine along with a general misunderstanding of what addiction is. These lead to myths and misconceptions about buprenorphine and countless unrelated side effects being attributed to it.

The first post in this thread has some precautions to take to help minimize the effects of dry mouth. Years of eroded enamel from dry mouth from opioids may only wear through while on buprenorphine, attributing all of that damage to buprenorphine would be wrong.

Ref:
Patent: http://www.naabt.org/documents/buprenorphine_patent.pdf
Research: http://www.coretext.org/
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Unread 01-21-2011, 03:43 PM   #20
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I dont think methadone itself causes your teeth to rot, but having been on methadone for 7yrs, now suboxone and having had 5 extractions (not including wisdom teeth) 4 root canals and severe decay on all of my remaining teeth w/ exception to my front 4, always having almost obsessive oral hygiene. Also witnessing my brother and several friends go through the same dental problems, all on long term maintanence. I believe these 3 factors can contribute to dental problems after long term MMT or BMT.
- The dry mouth caused by opioids
- Poor dietary habits/craving lots of very simple-sugar loaded food
- Stomach acid issues/GERD possibly exacerbated by chronic constipation
Just a thought
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Unread 01-21-2011, 05:16 PM   #21
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Good points, these are all things people in treatment should consider and make an extra effort to attend to dry mouth by drinking more water, chewing sugar free gum, or with specialized rinses, try and avoid sugary foods, and tend to constipation prevention (see the thread on constipation http://www.addictionsurvivors.org/vb...ad.php?t=14755 )
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Unread 01-28-2011, 11:56 PM   #22
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I was on opioids for 10 years, including Methadone and Actiq suckers. My teeth softened and rapidly dissolved above the gum line 7 years ago. I've been living in shame and unable to eat the foods that I love. I don't smile and I hate talking to people. I have a dental consult this coming Wednesday.
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Unread 02-12-2011, 05:24 PM   #23
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I've been thinking about this alot lately... My teeth have definitely gotten worse on sub but i think alot of it is self inflicted..I haven't had a checkup in like 2 years and I think the professional cleaning helps.. also, reading this thread has made me think about the acidity factor.. Sometimes I feel like the sub is messing with the enamel of my teeth becuase its so sweet and whatnot.. I don't let alot ge tout form under my tounge but theres always some runoff...
I have, up until recently, eaten alot of sugar and junk food... Also traveling and not remembering to brush daily.. I will definitely need a few fillings and can hopefully figure out these problems and how they are related to the sub..
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Unread 04-05-2011, 03:21 PM   #24
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I think its our unhealthy lifestyles that affected our teeth, not the substance. I always had good teeth until I became addicted. I'm now working on my second root canal, third crown, and fillings in almost every tooth. Pain goes with dental problems and opiates mask that pain. The dentist who did my first root canal said that it was the worst he'd ever seen. Well if I'm gonna do it, Ill do it right! Ha. I did have peeling gums initially with sub but that was quickly resolved with mouthwash. We just now have to deal with the consequences of our addictions.
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Unread 06-11-2011, 04:03 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anabolic1979 View Post
they are just figuring out the side effects on these drugs. were kinda the guinea pigs. 5 years ago when i went on subs there were only a couple side effects listed and i complained of many to my doc who told me it was not the suboxone lol i knew it was... now years later all those sides are now listed on the drug facts.
HI anabolic1979,
I agree with Linda about the Biotene. I started using it years ago, not because I had dry mouth, but because the products use some type of enzymes to clean your teeth, and it's not damaging or harsh to your gums like Listerine is. My son has also used it since he was little. Any mouthwash or toothpaste that "burns" is actually damaging to your gums because it irritates them. Biotene is especially for people with dry mouth. They have a mouthwash, toothpaste, sensitive toothpaste, gum, and a spray that keeps your mouth moisturized. I think there's even Aloe Vera in it. It's really good stuff. It's also really good for people with a receding gumline, like with gingivitis.
Hope this helps.
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Unread 08-06-2011, 04:35 PM   #26
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even without the opiate damage oral hygiene is such a $ saver!
I didn't have a cavity until I was 22. then Satan possessed
my teeth ...cavities and rootcanals galore. I had a dentist do a bad
job on 2 root canals. I wound up with a very serious extremely
painful disease called osteomyelitis in my teeth,jaw, and facial bones.
this is actually what let to the opiate use then
full on crazy abuse.recently I had to have 4 molars extracted
and couple of years of antibiotics. it seems like my wonderful
doctor beat the infection. since my dr worked so hard
I decided to pay us both back by getting sober
I've poored more $ into my mouth than all my possessions
combined. I truly hope sub doesn't do any more damage.
definitely going to do some research
go to a GOOD dentist ..take care of problems asap
biotine spray is great ..also get some rx. flouride rinse
or toothpaste ...we don't get enough b/c of filtered &bottled
water. why. are teeth soooo expensive!?
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Unread 08-08-2011, 07:51 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trs031 View Post
I've been lurking around this site, doctors advice since im clean and dont attend meetings, And as far as this topic goes I dont need scientific proof, when I have seen it with my own eyes.............

I did Oxis for roughly 5-6 years everyday, never once had teeth problem, Then got on METHADONE and within a 3 year period(especially with bad teeth genes, thanks mom shes got bout 50k in her mouth) MY Teeth got so BAD, It took 2 years of dental work to make it all pretty again. Thats when I realized enough was enough switched over to subs now im in the middle of of sub detox due to work complications... mind you Im only 25
My daughter is a hygentist. I had her ask her boss about medications of sort, and the damages, long term use ect.... He mentioned that yes the saliva issue caused damage, however he said that each individual is different, for some people who use drugs, may also have a childhood of taking excessive antibiotics and therefore would effect each individual case as well. That they are factors from out past that determine the outcome of our tooth life. It takes years for our teeth to fully break down from years of neglect & medications. That it is pretty hard to break our teeth down for they are "Built to Last a lifetime" and have their own way of protecting themselfs. All in all....there are no studies that have been done to determine if a particular medication causes tooth decay. They know "long term" use of any medication is bad. It is our personal history of dental hygene and our current habits and hygene that over a period of time break our teeth down. Your gums and habits determine our tooth destiny.
Hope this helps.
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Unread 08-08-2011, 06:05 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shalalagirl View Post
HI anabolic1979,
I agree with Linda about the Biotene. I started using it years ago, not because I had dry mouth, but because the products use some type of enzymes to clean your teeth, and it's not damaging or harsh to your gums like Listerine is. My son has also used it since he was little. Any mouthwash or toothpaste that "burns" is actually damaging to your gums because it irritates them. Biotene is especially for people with dry mouth. They have a mouthwash, toothpaste, sensitive toothpaste, gum, and a spray that keeps your mouth moisturized. I think there's even Aloe Vera in it. It's really good stuff. It's also really good for people with a receding gumline, like with gingivitis.
Hope this helps.
I do have the side effect of dry mouth, not only from Subutex, but from my blood pressure medicine. Does it really work? (the Biotene?) I have seen the ad for it. I think I even looked for it @ Walmart, however it was very expensive. I passed that visit, however, if it really works, then it is worth it. Usually WalMart has an Equate brand. Never fails....I love WalMarts Equate brand of EVERYTHING....Has never let me down. I will be going this evening, so I will be looking. Hope to hear from you....Tks!
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Unread 08-08-2011, 07:02 PM   #29
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it most definitely works. I like the spray over
the mouthwash. give it a try! check their website ...maybe
for a free sample or a coupon.
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Unread 03-06-2013, 03:41 PM   #30
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Default Updated side effects information at NAABT

Hi,
We recently updated the sides effects page at NAABT and today expanded the section concerning teeth. Methadone and now buprenorphine have been the subject of rumors that basically say that both medications "rot your teeth" or something along those lines. Although the rumor isn't literally true, a side effect of all opioids, dry mouth, can lead to tooth loss. The new section explains how and how to prevent it. Dental care is less often covered by insurance and can be expensive. For example to pull and replace a single tooth (modern implants) can cost over $3000, and that is for a healthy person without complications. Paying extra close attention to dental care now that you are in treatment might be the single best way to save money on treatment. Below is the added new text:

link to page: http://www.naabt.org/buprenorphine-side-effects.cfm


Dry mouth (xerostomia):

This may seem like an innocuous symptom, but it can be very serious and very costly.

Saliva is the mouth’s primary defense against tooth decay, gun disease, and maintains the health of the soft and hard tissues in the mouth. Saliva washes away food and other debris, neutralizes acids produced by bacteria in the mouth and provides disease-fighting substances throughout the mouth.

With dry mouth (which is a side effect from all opioids) these benefits are diminished which allows bacteria to multiply and often leads to gingivitis, periodontitis disease, and eventually bone and tooth loss.
Gingivitis: This is the earliest stage of gum disease, some bleeding with brushing and inflammation of your gums caused by plaque buildup at the gumline. At this early stage in gum disease, damage can be reversed, since the bone and connective tissue that hold the teeth in place are not yet affected.

Periodontitis: At this stage, the supporting bone and fibers that hold your teeth in place are irreversibly damaged. Your gums may begin to form a pocket below the gumline, which traps food and plaque. Proper dental treatment and improved home care can usually help prevent further damage.

Advanced Periodontitis: In this final stage of gum disease, the fibers and bone supporting your teeth are destroyed, which can cause your teeth to shift or loosen. This can affect your bite and, teeth may need to be removed.
Bacteria in plaque are the main cause of gingivitis and periodontitis. Plaque is a sticky film of microorganisms (biofilm) that continuously forms on the teeth and under the gumline. These bacteria may release toxins, especially below the gumline, that irritate the gum tissue and cause inflammation. Toxins or poisons -- produced by the bacteria in plaque as well as the body's “good” enzymes involved in fighting infections -- start to break down the bone and connective tissue that hold teeth in place. The gums may eventually break down and separate from the teeth causing a deep space called periodontal pockets. These pockets are very difficult to clean, allowing the bacteria to grow and multiply. As the disease progresses, the pockets deepen and more gum tissue and bone are destroyed. When this happens, teeth are no longer anchored in place, they become loose, and tooth loss occurs. Gum disease is the leading cause of tooth loss in adults, not tooth decay.

Other contributors to the risk and severity of periodontal gum disease and oral health problems are smoking and diabetes.

According to the CDC, researchers have uncovered potential links between gum disease and other serious health conditions. In people with healthy immune systems, the bacteria in the mouth that makes its way into the bloodstream is usually harmless. But under certain circumstances, these microorganisms are associated with health problems such as stroke and heart disease.

Avoid the pain and cost from the consequences of opioid-induced dry mouth by keeping well hydrated, use OTC treatment for dry-mouth such as Biotene, and pay especially close attention to good oral hygiene with routine dentist visits. Preventative oral care might be the single best way to save money associated with your addiction treatment. Do not overlook the importance of it.
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Important disclaimer: Any information in this post is not and does not constitute medical advice under any circumstances. Addiction Survivors, Inc. does not warranty or guarantee the accurateness, completeness, adequacy or currency of the information contained in or linked to the Site. Your use of information on the Site or materials linked to the Site is entirely at your own risk. Voluntary Disclosure: Timothy L. is the President of The National Alliance of Advocates for Buprenorphine treatment. (NAABT.org) The views and opinions of Timothy L., or any poster, are not necessarily the views of AddictionSurvivors.org. NEVER take any online advice over that of a qualified healthcare provider Any information you read here should only serve to inspire you to investigate further with credible, verifiable referenced sources or your doctor.
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Unread 03-26-2013, 11:33 PM   #31
willard47
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ya think?
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Unread 04-25-2013, 09:55 PM   #32
Babygirl09
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Thanks for the info, this is actually good to know. I never heard anything like this before and makes me want to make sure I take very good care of my teeth from now on. Although I haven't had very many teeth problems before and it makes me think that this might not be very accurate.
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Unread 06-09-2013, 03:14 PM   #33
Newlife30
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Wow so much awesome information here. My gums have receaded a bit I could t figure why? The info I read explains it along with the dentist saying I brush wayyyyy to hard like I'm mad at my teeth! I just want them to be clean! Thank u thank u thank u!
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Unread 06-10-2013, 01:01 AM   #34
amber.4.14.11
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Greetings friends, both old and new......
it's been a long time since I posted anything here, but I DO,
read posts quite often, here.... just so you all know
I wanted to add,,,
it's been JUST about a year now, since I had ALL BUT 4 TEETH PULLED, and got
dentures at 30 years old....
I had an 8 year (or so) addiction cycle,, to ALL opiates... mostly methadone, at the end, is what I was abusing, and some heroin.....
ANYWAY,,
my point is,, the dentist I ended up going to,
told me he's been in practice since 1982,, and the last five years, he's seen more
mouths, that looked like MINE when I walked in,,, in people UNDER 25,
than all added together, his entire practicing career...
he's also an "MD"
and said in his "professional opinion" its the infatuation w/opiates, and prescription drugs, coupled with abuse/addiction and not taking care of your teeth.
Just like what was stated above,,,
when your worried about getting "dope sick" you don't want to spend 200 bucks on a teeth cleaning.........
Okay,,, so my teeth were REALLY BAD..... and I had a very difficult pregnancy in 08,
where I vomited daily, for MONTHS, and that couldn't have been great either....
my teeth,
ended up costing about 7 GRAND(no insurance), total.... but I sure do feel better.. and I eat MUCH HEALTHIER!!!!
anyone of you that have bad teeth, probably can relate to that......
I had all the tops pulled at once, NOT put "under" either,
and the bottoms, a few months later... Same thing,, Not put to sleep,,, the dentist had to cut my gums open, and chip them out, since they were broken at the gumline....
NO PAIN PILLS EITHER...
I did it, I made it with motrin, Tylenol, and my suboxone.. and a whole BUNCH of support/encouragement from friends/family...
Well,,
that's it... Nice to talk to ya'll....
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Unread 06-10-2013, 04:16 AM   #35
Leo
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Thumbs up Thank you Amber

Thank you so much for your time in sharing that with everyone Amber. I am sure it will help no-end with people's motivation.

Very best wishes

Leo
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Unread 07-07-2013, 02:26 PM   #36
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My teeth have become a total mess in the last 11yrs. I am only 31yrs old and do not have a single tooth in my mouth that hasnt had a cavity or root canal. I actually went to school to be a dental assistant and was a dental assistant for about 3yrs and then addiction took over my life. I did take great care of my teeth in my 20's and have recently started back with a great teeth hygeine.
Ok, so I was on methadone for 7yrs. In those 7yrs my teeth quickly decayed. I have a total of 18 teeth in my mouth. Before methadone I had the most beautiful smile and teeth thanks to many years of braces. I have been on subs for 4yrs and I also feel that they have effected my teeth. I am in the process now of getting all my teeth fixed. I had 7 teeth pulled total, 2 root canals and every tooth has had a filling. I just had my impressions done for top and bottom partials. Those will be in by the end of the month. I am not sure how well I will do with partials, but we will see. I sometimes I feel that I would be better getting everything pulled and getting dentures, but the dentist disagree and said I should be able to keep the teeth I have left for a long time as long as I keep up with visits and repairing any new cavities quickly.

So I definately believe that methadone and suboxone have in some way ruined my teeth. I have no other explaination for it. I think I will eventually end up with dentures, but am going to do my best to keep the teeth that I do have.
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Unread 07-07-2013, 04:30 PM   #37
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Amy412,

I’m sorry to hear about your tooth loss, I know it can be psychologically and physically painful to deal with. I wish you found us sooner; maybe the information could have prevented some of your dental problems. Thanks for posting about your experience.

I hope the people who read about your experience and take steps to prevent it from happening to them. This thread (and the links within it) explain the mechanism in which opioids (and many other medications) contribute to tooth loss, and also explains how to take countermeasures to prevent it.

Dry mouth is infrequently talked about as a side effect to buprenorphine treatment and might be overlooked by many to their peril. Because it is slow to cause damage, by both gum disease and erosion of enamel, signs of damage might not become evident until it’s too late. I have not seen dry month warnings in the literature nor have I heard doctors warning patients about it. I think many in the treatment industry allow stigma and stereotyping to mistakenly conclude any associated dental problems are caused solely by poor dental hygiene, but this may not be the case.

I urge everyone who hasn't yet read the common side effects page do so and take it seriously. Constipation and dry mouth can both have unpleasant and permanent complications but both can be prevented.

Here’s the link: http://www.naabt.org/buprenorphine-side-effects.cfm

Tim
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Important disclaimer: Any information in this post is not and does not constitute medical advice under any circumstances. Addiction Survivors, Inc. does not warranty or guarantee the accurateness, completeness, adequacy or currency of the information contained in or linked to the Site. Your use of information on the Site or materials linked to the Site is entirely at your own risk. Voluntary Disclosure: Timothy L. is the President of The National Alliance of Advocates for Buprenorphine treatment. (NAABT.org) The views and opinions of Timothy L., or any poster, are not necessarily the views of AddictionSurvivors.org. NEVER take any online advice over that of a qualified healthcare provider Any information you read here should only serve to inspire you to investigate further with credible, verifiable referenced sources or your doctor.
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