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Unread 05-21-2010, 06:20 PM   #1
akrec2
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Hi, new here. My son started on suboxone saturday, almost a week ago. he is on 12mg a day. 8 in am and 4 in pm. He is at a residential treatment ctr and they give him his meds. I noticed when I picked him up for appts and mtgs this week that he seemed high. He is a heroine addict. He has been clean since 4/20/10 and in the center. He acts like he did when he was on heroine. He is nodding off, slurring and his pupils are pinpoint. I know he hasn't taken any drugs and was fine until he started the sub. Is this side effects? I am not sure this is any better than the heroine at this point. Can you give any advice? I called his doctor and asked if he could get high off the suboxone and I was told that he never had anyone get high off them,
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Unread 05-21-2010, 06:41 PM   #2
NancyB
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Hi akrec2, those symptoms generally indicate that his dose is too high and it needs to be adjusted down. If the doctor does adjust it down, then it can take a couple/three days to notice a difference.

Welcome, and congratulations to your son for getting his life back.

Let us know what the doctor says.

Nancy
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Important disclaimer: Any information in this post is not and does not constitute medical advice under any circumstances. Addiction Survivors, Inc. does not warranty or guarantee the accurateness, completeness, adequacy or currency of the information contained in or linked to the Site. Your use of information on the Site or materials linked to the Site is entirely at your own risk. NEVER take any online advice over that of a qualified healthcare provider. Any information contained on AddictionSurvivors.org should only serve to inspire further investigation with credible, verifiable references sources such as your physician or therapist.
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Unread 05-21-2010, 11:10 PM   #3
akrec2
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Thanks Nancy. I have been reading alot on here today and see that you are a great comfort and source of info to many. If the doc doesn't reduce his dose, will these symptoms get better? I told him about the dose maybe being too high, but he disagrees and said that he is gettig use to it. Guess we will see. He sees the doc again in 3 weeks. Will let you know how it goes. Thanks again for such a quick reply. Glad I found this site. I also hope that he has finally turned the corner and wants his old life back. Surely a struggle everday but I am hopeful he will succeed as so many seem to have from all the reading I have done today.
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Unread 05-22-2010, 07:46 AM   #4
NancyB
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Hi akrec2, if the doctor doesn't reduce his dose, yes, he will adjust to that dose. It would be better if the dose could be reduced, he'd feel a lot better, but sometimes it takes a little bit to realize that with Suboxone it's opposite of the former drug of choice. Taking more usually only results in constipation, lethargy and for some, depression. That can be difficult to realize at the beginning because the patient is used to 'more is better' where with Suboxone 'less is more'.

Please let us know how he's doing when you get a chance.

Importantly, how are YOU doing??

Nancy
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Important disclaimer: Any information in this post is not and does not constitute medical advice under any circumstances. Addiction Survivors, Inc. does not warranty or guarantee the accurateness, completeness, adequacy or currency of the information contained in or linked to the Site. Your use of information on the Site or materials linked to the Site is entirely at your own risk. NEVER take any online advice over that of a qualified healthcare provider. Any information contained on AddictionSurvivors.org should only serve to inspire further investigation with credible, verifiable references sources such as your physician or therapist.
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Unread 05-22-2010, 04:02 PM   #5
akrec2
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i am doing a lot better now. it has been a rough few years. he is 23 and has been hooked on heroine for about 3 years. when he was still on our insurance we tried to get him help, we had to enlist the the help of law enforcement, that was really ard to do for me. he is my youngest and my only son, so it was a tough thing to call the cops on him. I felt I had no choice, he was either going to hurt himself or someone else, not intentionally, but still. he totalled my car once, i believe he was high when he did it, but the cops just brought him home, guess they thought he was was just lethargic from accident. Anyway, it has been tough. He did go to rehab for about 90 days, was good for about 4 mos and then relapsed. He is now in a drug court program. I went into hospital for anxiety at end of April and he went to detox on his own. I am hoping he has finally realized that he is hurting himself and everyone around him. It was his idea to get on suboxone. They were trying to push methadone, but we talked and he didn't want that. So his father and I have agreed to pay for the treatment for him, he says when he gets out of treatment center, he is going to sober house and will get a job and pay for how much of it he can on his own. I am on zoloft now and feel pretty good. I still get anxious when he comes home. I guess it is all those years of wondering what was in store at our house with him there. But he is back to being polite and quiet, which is his true demeanor. He is coming home this evening for 5 hrs on a pass. He has an old friend that just got out of 5 years in the navy and he is coming to visit. He should be a good influence on him. I am optimistic that this time will work for him. This is the most involved in treatment he has been, so maybe he has come to grips. I can only support him and hope for the best. He knows that we will no longer let him live here if he continues down the road of drugs, he also has two sisters that distance themselves from him when he is like that. He misses them. I found a picture of the three of them on Santa's lap when they were little in the center console of his truck, so I know he loves and misses them. I appreciate the time you have take to talk with me. I have tried a few groups here, but can't seem to find the right fit. Nice to have someone who understands the disease to talk with. Thank you
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Unread 05-23-2010, 09:04 AM   #6
NancyB
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Hi akrec2, I'm hoping that this was an epiphany of sorts for your son and he's on the right track. Having that picture in the truck is probably a very powerful reminder and incentive for him. It does sound like he wants it this time - I really hope so. I don't blame you for getting anxious when he comes home. You've been through so much and it will take time for you to regain that trust in him and what he's doing. That's very common, so please don't feel guilty because you feel that way. I'm glad the zoloft is working for you and you're taking care of yourself.

Oh, the manufacturer has a free med program, here's the link:
http://www.needymeds.org/drug_list.t...&name=Suboxone

Does he have a doctor lined up for when he gets out of the treatment center, when does he get out? Depending on where you are, it might be worth just taking a peek to see how many doctors are in the area. This thread has some different ways of finding one.
http://www.addictionsurvivors.org/vb...ad.php?t=21259

I hope his visit went well last night.

I'm glad you found us.

Nancy
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Important disclaimer: Any information in this post is not and does not constitute medical advice under any circumstances. Addiction Survivors, Inc. does not warranty or guarantee the accurateness, completeness, adequacy or currency of the information contained in or linked to the Site. Your use of information on the Site or materials linked to the Site is entirely at your own risk. NEVER take any online advice over that of a qualified healthcare provider. Any information contained on AddictionSurvivors.org should only serve to inspire further investigation with credible, verifiable references sources such as your physician or therapist.
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Unread 05-23-2010, 10:35 AM   #7
toms
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I agree. Sounds like he is doing well for this early. There is anecdotal evidence that some folks get a "buzz" off suboxone early on, especially if they hadn't really been on opiates that long beforehand.

Nancy said it all ( she usually does!). Hard it seems, all one can do is take care of themselves. I've seen a lot of people recover and we all need help. I've come to the conclusion that, with that help we choose to accept, in our hearts, until we truly decide " I am through with this", we have more work to do. Tough to describe: it is a path we cannot follow *by* ourselves, but ultimately, at last parts of that path *must* be walked alone.
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Unread 05-23-2010, 05:35 PM   #8
Jamesisdone
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Is your son being perscribed any other meds along with his Sub that could cause drowsiness? Nancy is right that, too high of a dose, will do that to him but he will adjust even if it's not lowered. You said you're not sure the Sub is any better than the heroin at this point, I hope that you give the Sub a chance and give your son time to adjust and I think you'll see a huge difference. The Sub will stop cravings for opioids and allow him to not go through withdrawls from comming off of the herion. During his treatment with Sub it's important for your son to remain in therapy to work through the issues that lead to his disease and to learn coping skills and how to avoid relapse. Addiction is a baffleing disease and it affects the person battleing it and those close to him/her so I think it's wonderful that you found this site to educate yourself about the disease and the medication assisted treatment he is recieving. Your support for him is wonderful although I know it's still important to stand your ground and keep the boundries that you and your family have set. With time, if he is ready and works through the needed steps to treat this, you will be able to learn to trust and feel safe again. It is hard because the only thing that helps with all of this is time (to see if he follows through). Good-luck to your son and I'm sending my prayers to you and yours. Thank you for helping him and for paying for his treatment. Just remember to also take care of yourself, do something good for you, you deserve it
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