Addiction Survivors

Notices

Reply
Unread 02-26-2010, 03:40 PM   #1
TIM
Senior Member
 
TIM's Avatar
 
Posts: 4,632
Default Phases of treatment - Medication is only a small part

Starting treatment can be overwhelming, here is guide that maps out what an entire treatment plan consists of. In looking at the available information available on the web there needs to be somewhat of a guide that outlines the entire treatment program and allows patients to know where they are in the continuum, how to measure milestones and how to measure success. We are planning on adding content to the NAABT site aimed at helping patients navigate through the treatment process to help keep the recovery moving forward. To start, I’ve outlined what we believe are the phases of a successful recovery. Please comment or make suggestions and we’ll publish a comprehensive guide when finished.
Tim

First its important to state the purpose of buprenorphine treatment:

The purpose of buprenorphine treatment is to suppress the debilitating symptoms of cravings and withdrawal, which then enables the patient to participate in therapy, counseling and peer support, in order to implement the positive long-term changes in their lives that will translate to new healthy patterns of behavior and lead to sustained addiction remission.


Phase1 (1 day – 2 weeks)
Stabilize on the medication to suppress cravings and withdrawal symptoms. Identify and begin to treat any co-occurring physical disorder, like HIV or HEP-C.

Phase 2 (1-4 weeks)
Identify and begin to treat any co-occurring psychiatric conditions, like Bipolar, depression, or anxiety.

Phase 3 (1-2 weeks)
Build support system: peer support (Example: online forums or live 12 step), friends and family support, religion (if applicable)

Phase 4 (1-6 months)
Change environmental factors that contribute to the disease. For example, if you have roommates who are in active addiction, relocate. If places, people or things trigger cravings or are associated with your drug use, make an effort to disassociate to the extent possible.

Phase 5 (1-6 months)
Reduce sources of stress, anxiety and depression in your life to the extent possible. Rebuild finances, repair relationships, end toxic relationships, use counseling and therapy to learn to deal with any trauma in your life. A counselor, life coach or therapist can be very helpful here.

Phase 6 (1-6 months)
Develop new healthy patterns of behavior. This in effect rewires the brain. As you deal with normal stress and anxiety and do it without the use of drugs, you will change your reflex reaction to take drugs, to one of dealing with what is presented to you in a healthy way. While in active addiction brain pathways have been created making drug taking your reflex reaction to stress, dealing with stress without drugs helps reverse that brain alteration. It's this process of reconditioning that is recovery. This is a deliberate effort and doesn't just happen automatically, it's the real work of recovery.

Phase 7 (3-6 months)
Once you have made significant changes and have experience and a track record of repeatedly dealing with stressful situations and normal life in a healthy way, it may be time to move to the medication-free stage of treatment. At this point a slow taper is started pacing dose decreases with your brain’s ability to adapt to each dose decrease. (no more than 25% dose decrease at a time)

Phase 8
If you are able to keep the addiction in remission without an opioid supplement, you will use the cognitive tools you learned in treatment to deal with any lingering or occasional cravings or triggers. You will be able to recognize the precursors to a relapse and be armed with the techniques to intervene.



Total time could be 6 months to several years
__________________
A


Important disclaimer: Any information in this post is not and does not constitute medical advice under any circumstances. Addiction Survivors, Inc. does not warranty or guarantee the accurateness, completeness, adequacy or currency of the information contained in or linked to the Site. Your use of information on the Site or materials linked to the Site is entirely at your own risk. Voluntary Disclosure: Timothy L. is the President of The National Alliance of Advocates for Buprenorphine treatment. (NAABT.org) The views and opinions of Timothy L., or any poster, are not necessarily the views of AddictionSurvivors.org. NEVER take any online advice over that of a qualified healthcare provider Any information you read here should only serve to inspire you to investigate further with credible, verifiable referenced sources or your doctor.
TIM is offline   Reply With Quote
28 Users Say Thank You to TIM For This Useful Post:
Thank You (02-26-2010), Thank You (06-18-2012), Thank You (06-16-2012), Thank You (08-25-2014), Thank You (06-12-2011), Thank You (05-03-2010), Thank You (08-23-2011), Thank You (08-18-2012), Thank You (09-13-2010), Thank You (04-20-2013), Thank You (10-18-2011), Thank You (05-30-2013), Thank You (07-08-2011), Thank You (03-01-2010), Thank You (01-06-2011), Thank You (02-26-2010), Thank You (05-28-2010), Thank You (04-20-2010), Thank You (08-07-2011), Thank You (04-09-2011), Thank You (02-26-2010), Thank You (07-23-2011), Thank You (03-06-2010), Thank You (11-20-2010), Thank You (05-02-2011), Thank You (07-03-2011), Thank You (07-09-2011), Thank You (11-09-2010)
Unread 02-26-2010, 06:19 PM   #2
toms
Senior Member
 
toms's Avatar
 
Posts: 880
Default

I would think that six months is far from whatever the normal time-on-meds happens to be. I've never known anyone who has tapered off in anywhere near that amount of time. Of course, my peers tend to be former MMT patients and hard-core addicts. Its only online where I've heard of young kids who have never had any form of treatment get crosswise with pain meds and *boom*, they go onto suboxone expecting fast relief. Maybe the scope of treatment or level of life troubles that indicate ORT has broadened in the treatment field. I cannot understand recommending someone start ORT without having exhausting less interventionist forms of treatment.

I just read the story of a young man who had abused Percocet for six months. The amount he was taking in a month was less than many folks I've known take in a day. His doctor was placing him on suboxone and he had it all figured out....he would take it no more than three months. There seems to be a lot of expectations for quick "cures" that turn to griping about what a horrible drug suboxone is.
__________________
Tom S.
toms is offline   Reply With Quote
3 Users Say Thank You to toms For This Useful Post:
Thank You (06-18-2012), Thank You (06-26-2013), Thank You (10-18-2011)
Unread 02-27-2010, 01:02 AM   #3
vhappy
Senior Member
 
Posts: 2,121
Default

My 21 year old daughter went into a two month treatment program for opiate addiction. She had been using pretty heavy for about 2 years mostly snorting oxy's and had been messing with H for about the last 6 months. The treatment she received was very good and very anti suboxone. She is Alaska Native and they focused alot of her treatment based on her culture focusing on healing mind body and soul. I was very skeptical and when she came home, I thought the honeymoon would most likley wear off soon. I felt if her brain needed to make changes, she may not have had enough time and was in great risk of relapse. It has been 6 months and she is very active in her recovery, no relapses or craves. I think suboxone was absolutly needed for my succsess and she seems to be doing great with out it. She is not anti-suboxone thank god, because they told her she couldn't be with me because I wasn't clean. Oh back to my question, do you think a "younger brain" has the ability to change or heal faster. I think If it was me with her same treatment the chances are pretty high that I would have relapsed. My daughter is open to suboxone and doesn't judge me, she agrees it is the right treatment for me, and the path she is on is right for her.

Vhappy
vhappy is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 02-27-2010, 09:49 AM   #4
Heath
Senior Member
 
Posts: 701
Default

Im glad she's down with you doing what u needd to be healthy. Whoever would be anit-anything that makes you live and feel better? Whoever is anti-sub has never overcome a habit.
Heath
Heath is offline   Reply With Quote
One User Says Thank You to Heath For This Useful Post:
Thank You (03-01-2010)
Unread 03-01-2010, 10:12 AM   #5
TIM
Senior Member
 
TIM's Avatar
 
Posts: 4,632
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by toms View Post
I would think that six months is far from whatever the normal time-on-meds happens to be. I've never known anyone who has tapered off in anywhere near that amount of time. ....
I just read the story of a young man who had abused Percocet for six months. The amount he was taking in a month was less than many folks I've known take in a day. His doctor was placing him on suboxone and he had it all figured out....he would take it no more than three months. There seems to be a lot of expectations for quick "cures" that turn to griping about what a horrible drug suboxone is.
Tom
I agree few people would be successful with only a six month treatment. A person who might do well is someone with a very short history who just recently crossed the threshold of addiction. Someone who doesn’t have other people in their life who are in active addiction and who doesn’t have any co-occurring physical or psychological disorders. It would have to be someone who hasn’t destroyed relationships or finances and still has a job. Someone with a good support system who can quickly develop the tools needed to maintain addiction remission without medication.

Then there are the people who are only physically dependent who shouldn’t have begun buprenorphine treatment in the first place. Patients who are taking pain medication as directed for a legitimate chronic pain condition, who think they are “addicted” or whose doctor thinks they are “addicted” just because they have withdrawal if they stop. Misdiagnosis like this are still happening, patients taking opioid pain medication appropriately are being forced into addiction treatment because they and their doctor don’t understand the difference between addiction and physical dependence. These patients can do well with a short 6 month (or less) treatment, although they would have done well without it too by simply tapering off the opioids they were on if it was no longer needed.

Unrealistic expectations and a general misunderstanding of what addiction is and what the purpose of treatment is, leads to disappointment and ultimately blaming the treatment med. I think many of the anti-bupe group fall into this category.

Tim
__________________
A


Important disclaimer: Any information in this post is not and does not constitute medical advice under any circumstances. Addiction Survivors, Inc. does not warranty or guarantee the accurateness, completeness, adequacy or currency of the information contained in or linked to the Site. Your use of information on the Site or materials linked to the Site is entirely at your own risk. Voluntary Disclosure: Timothy L. is the President of The National Alliance of Advocates for Buprenorphine treatment. (NAABT.org) The views and opinions of Timothy L., or any poster, are not necessarily the views of AddictionSurvivors.org. NEVER take any online advice over that of a qualified healthcare provider Any information you read here should only serve to inspire you to investigate further with credible, verifiable referenced sources or your doctor.
TIM is offline   Reply With Quote
8 Users Say Thank You to TIM For This Useful Post:
Thank You (06-04-2012), Thank You (04-23-2010), Thank You (10-18-2011), Thank You (05-15-2013), Thank You (01-04-2012), Thank You (05-28-2010), Thank You (01-24-2016), Thank You (03-20-2010)
Unread 03-01-2010, 10:20 AM   #6
TIM
Senior Member
 
TIM's Avatar
 
Posts: 4,632
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by vhappy View Post
My 21 year old daughter went into a two month treatment program for opiate addiction. She had been using pretty heavy for about 2 years mostly snorting oxy's and had been messing with H for about the last 6 months. The treatment she received was very good and very anti suboxone. She is Alaska Native and they focused alot of her treatment based on her culture focusing on healing mind body and soul. I was very skeptical and when she came home, I thought the honeymoon would most likley wear off soon. I felt if her brain needed to make changes, she may not have had enough time and was in great risk of relapse. It has been 6 months and she is very active in her recovery, no relapses or craves. I think suboxone was absolutly needed for my succsess and she seems to be doing great with out it. She is not anti-suboxone thank god, because they told her she couldn't be with me because I wasn't clean. Oh back to my question, do you think a "younger brain" has the ability to change or heal faster. I think If it was me with her same treatment the chances are pretty high that I would have relapsed. My daughter is open to suboxone and doesn't judge me, she agrees it is the right treatment for me, and the path she is on is right for her.

Vhappy
Congratulations to your daughter!! It's thought that about 5% of people can achieve sustained addiction remission without the help of medication. This was true before bupe too. Sometimes those folks become very vocal and anti-medication, because they think everyone else can do it too. Most people cannot stop long-term without medical intervention. Younger brains are definitely more plastic and have the ability to adapt faster, but even old brains are shown to still be able to make changes. It was once thought that after a certain age the brain was unable to make adaptations like that, but recent brain science has shown that even older brains have much more capacity for change than once thought. I'm glad you daughter has a modern philosophy of treatment, congratulations you too!
Tim
__________________
A


Important disclaimer: Any information in this post is not and does not constitute medical advice under any circumstances. Addiction Survivors, Inc. does not warranty or guarantee the accurateness, completeness, adequacy or currency of the information contained in or linked to the Site. Your use of information on the Site or materials linked to the Site is entirely at your own risk. Voluntary Disclosure: Timothy L. is the President of The National Alliance of Advocates for Buprenorphine treatment. (NAABT.org) The views and opinions of Timothy L., or any poster, are not necessarily the views of AddictionSurvivors.org. NEVER take any online advice over that of a qualified healthcare provider Any information you read here should only serve to inspire you to investigate further with credible, verifiable referenced sources or your doctor.
TIM is offline   Reply With Quote
2 Users Say Thank You to TIM For This Useful Post:
Thank You (06-04-2012), Thank You (03-20-2010)
Unread 03-02-2010, 12:49 PM   #7
TIM
Senior Member
 
TIM's Avatar
 
Posts: 4,632
Default

Phase1. (1 day – 2 weeks)
Stabilize on the medication to suppress cravings and withdrawal symptoms. Identify and begin to treat any co-occurring physical disorder, like HIV or HEP-C.

Finding a doctor http://www.naabt.org/treatmentmatch/ or http://www.naabt.org/tl/buprenorphin...-treatment.cfm

Induction day: http://www.naabt.org/documents/NAABT_PrecipWD.pdf
Buprenorphine treatment overview: http://www.naabt.org/education/what_bt_like.cfm

Overview brochure about buprenorphine treatment: http://www.naabt.org/documents/naabt...ersion%202.pdf

more educational materials: http://www.naabt.org/education.cfm
__________________
A


Important disclaimer: Any information in this post is not and does not constitute medical advice under any circumstances. Addiction Survivors, Inc. does not warranty or guarantee the accurateness, completeness, adequacy or currency of the information contained in or linked to the Site. Your use of information on the Site or materials linked to the Site is entirely at your own risk. Voluntary Disclosure: Timothy L. is the President of The National Alliance of Advocates for Buprenorphine treatment. (NAABT.org) The views and opinions of Timothy L., or any poster, are not necessarily the views of AddictionSurvivors.org. NEVER take any online advice over that of a qualified healthcare provider Any information you read here should only serve to inspire you to investigate further with credible, verifiable referenced sources or your doctor.
TIM is offline   Reply With Quote
2 Users Say Thank You to TIM For This Useful Post:
Thank You (06-04-2012), Thank You (03-30-2015)
Unread 03-02-2010, 12:50 PM   #8
TIM
Senior Member
 
TIM's Avatar
 
Posts: 4,632
Default

Phase 2 (1-4 weeks)
Identify and begin to treat any co-occurring psychiatric conditions, like Bipolar, depression, or anxiety.


Many people who have become addicted to opioids have done so as a result of self-medicating an undiagnosed mental illness, like depression or an anxiety disorder. While in active active addiction the symptoms of these conditions may have been suppressed. But once buprenorphine treatment starts the symptoms may no longer be suppressed and can reemerge. If this happens, these conditions must be diagnosed and treated in addition to treatment for the addiction. The buprenorphine will only suppress symptoms of cravings and withdrawal. Anxiety or depression, if severe, will need specialized treatment.

It can be difficult to know if what you feel are normal symptoms of transitioning to the treatment medication or an underlying condition. This is where a counselor or other medical professional can help you determine if what you are feeling is normal and will pass or if you need medical intervention.

Sometimes the underlying issue can be more severe than the addiction and without treatment could cause you to relapse after the addiction treatment has completed. Recording your symptoms in a log or journal can help health care professionals make a diagnoses

Counselor locator: http://www.naabt.org/local/index.cfm?s=Counselor&sr=1
__________________
A


Important disclaimer: Any information in this post is not and does not constitute medical advice under any circumstances. Addiction Survivors, Inc. does not warranty or guarantee the accurateness, completeness, adequacy or currency of the information contained in or linked to the Site. Your use of information on the Site or materials linked to the Site is entirely at your own risk. Voluntary Disclosure: Timothy L. is the President of The National Alliance of Advocates for Buprenorphine treatment. (NAABT.org) The views and opinions of Timothy L., or any poster, are not necessarily the views of AddictionSurvivors.org. NEVER take any online advice over that of a qualified healthcare provider Any information you read here should only serve to inspire you to investigate further with credible, verifiable referenced sources or your doctor.
TIM is offline   Reply With Quote
One User Says Thank You to TIM For This Useful Post:
Thank You (06-04-2012)
Unread 03-02-2010, 12:51 PM   #9
TIM
Senior Member
 
TIM's Avatar
 
Posts: 4,632
Default

Phase 3 (1-2 weeks)
Build support system: peer support (Example: online forums or live 12 step), friends and family support, religion (if applicable)


There's nothing like being able to talk to someone who has been through it. Whether we are talking about cancer or addiction having a survivor to talk with who can relate to what you are going through is a great help and an anxiety reducer. This is called peer support.

To be useful peer support must be seen a s tool and used correctly. It's important to understand what peer support is for and what it is not for. For example, using peer advice over medical advice is obviously a bad idea, but other situations can be less obvious and you have to learn what the limitations of peer support is when you should consult medical professionals. Peer support is useful in helping you decide what questions to ask your doctor.



about peer support: http://www.addictionsurvivors.org/do...rvBrochure.pdf

find live meetings at the bottom of this page www.naabt.org/local

Take advantage of the free HeretoHelp service http://www.naabt.org/hth/ to help organize your treatment plan and stay on course.
__________________
A


Important disclaimer: Any information in this post is not and does not constitute medical advice under any circumstances. Addiction Survivors, Inc. does not warranty or guarantee the accurateness, completeness, adequacy or currency of the information contained in or linked to the Site. Your use of information on the Site or materials linked to the Site is entirely at your own risk. Voluntary Disclosure: Timothy L. is the President of The National Alliance of Advocates for Buprenorphine treatment. (NAABT.org) The views and opinions of Timothy L., or any poster, are not necessarily the views of AddictionSurvivors.org. NEVER take any online advice over that of a qualified healthcare provider Any information you read here should only serve to inspire you to investigate further with credible, verifiable referenced sources or your doctor.
TIM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 03-02-2010, 12:52 PM   #10
TIM
Senior Member
 
TIM's Avatar
 
Posts: 4,632
Default

Phase 4 (1-6 months)
Change environmental factors that contribute to the disease. For example, if you have roommates who are in active addiction, relocate. If places, people or things trigger cravings or are associated with your drug use, disassociate to the extent possible.

This is often one of the harder phases of a treatment plan, because it involves a major disruption and change to your life and maybe expense. But for people living within a high risk environment it is essential. For example if you have a job where everyone is in active addiction, you chances at longterm addiction remission will be slim if you stay with that job. Not only are the people an influence but things associated with that job are triggers that remind you and reinforce the brain pathways you are trying to change. Equally as difficult is when a spouse remains in active addiction and you cannot remove yourself from the toxic environment. This phase can be very difficult and take a long time depending on your ability to remove yourself from addiction related environments.

If environment cannot be changed consider inpatient treatment.
__________________
A


Important disclaimer: Any information in this post is not and does not constitute medical advice under any circumstances. Addiction Survivors, Inc. does not warranty or guarantee the accurateness, completeness, adequacy or currency of the information contained in or linked to the Site. Your use of information on the Site or materials linked to the Site is entirely at your own risk. Voluntary Disclosure: Timothy L. is the President of The National Alliance of Advocates for Buprenorphine treatment. (NAABT.org) The views and opinions of Timothy L., or any poster, are not necessarily the views of AddictionSurvivors.org. NEVER take any online advice over that of a qualified healthcare provider Any information you read here should only serve to inspire you to investigate further with credible, verifiable referenced sources or your doctor.
TIM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 03-02-2010, 12:55 PM   #11
TIM
Senior Member
 
TIM's Avatar
 
Posts: 4,632
Default

Phase 5 (1-6 months)
Reduce stress, anxiety and depression in your life by changing the causes to the extent possible. Rebuild finances, repair relationships, end toxic relationships, use counseling and therapy to learn to deal with any trauma in your life. A counselor, life coach or therapist can be very helpful here.


This phase consists of identifying and eliminating reasons and causes of relapse. Stress, anxiety, depression are all reasons to take drugs, reducing the causes of these emotions improves your chances of success and improved the quality of your life. This phase is when you really see your life getting better and you begin to see things improving.

Phase 6(1-6 months)
Develop new healthy patterns of behavior. This in effect rewires the brain. As you deal with normal stress and anxiety and do it without the use of drugs, you will change your reflex reaction to take drugs to one of dealing with what is presented to you in a healthy way. While in active addiction brain pathways have been created making drug taking your reflex reaction to stress, dealing with stress without drugs helps reverse that reflex reaction.


This is the real work of recovery and what will ultimately determine if you are successful or not. Reversing brain adaptations is preferable to fighting existing adaptations for life. By reversing brain adaptations caused by addiction you can minimize or eliminate the causes of cravings, which often lead to relapse even years later.

Skipping this part will not move you forward, instead the medication will just pause your addiction and if the medication is discontinued strong cravings will return and likely end in relapse. Actively working to change brain pathways by forcing yourself into new experiences and learning new things, will change the brain and disassociate your experience from active addiction.

See this page to understand why doing these things will have a physical effect on the disease of addiction http://www.naabt.org/education/behav...-the-brain.cfm
__________________
A


Important disclaimer: Any information in this post is not and does not constitute medical advice under any circumstances. Addiction Survivors, Inc. does not warranty or guarantee the accurateness, completeness, adequacy or currency of the information contained in or linked to the Site. Your use of information on the Site or materials linked to the Site is entirely at your own risk. Voluntary Disclosure: Timothy L. is the President of The National Alliance of Advocates for Buprenorphine treatment. (NAABT.org) The views and opinions of Timothy L., or any poster, are not necessarily the views of AddictionSurvivors.org. NEVER take any online advice over that of a qualified healthcare provider Any information you read here should only serve to inspire you to investigate further with credible, verifiable referenced sources or your doctor.
TIM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 03-02-2010, 12:56 PM   #12
TIM
Senior Member
 
TIM's Avatar
 
Posts: 4,632
Default

Phase 7 (3-6 months)
Once you have made significant changes and have a track record of repeatedly dealing with stressful situations and normal life in a healthy way, it may be time to move to the medication-free stage of treatment. At this point a slow taper is started pacing dose decreases with your brain’s ability to adapt to each dose decrease.

The reason you taper off should be, because you don't need the medication any longer. Don't let pressure from well-meaning, but uninformed , people influence thsi decision. Don't feel guilty about being on an opioid. At this point in your treatment, if done correctly, you might be forgetting to take your medication at times. That's a good sign because its an indication that opioids are no longer your top priority.

Taper threads http://www.addictionsurvivors.org/vb...splay.php?f=80
__________________
A


Important disclaimer: Any information in this post is not and does not constitute medical advice under any circumstances. Addiction Survivors, Inc. does not warranty or guarantee the accurateness, completeness, adequacy or currency of the information contained in or linked to the Site. Your use of information on the Site or materials linked to the Site is entirely at your own risk. Voluntary Disclosure: Timothy L. is the President of The National Alliance of Advocates for Buprenorphine treatment. (NAABT.org) The views and opinions of Timothy L., or any poster, are not necessarily the views of AddictionSurvivors.org. NEVER take any online advice over that of a qualified healthcare provider Any information you read here should only serve to inspire you to investigate further with credible, verifiable referenced sources or your doctor.
TIM is offline   Reply With Quote
2 Users Say Thank You to TIM For This Useful Post:
Thank You (06-04-2012), Thank You (01-25-2011)
Unread 03-02-2010, 01:00 PM   #13
TIM
Senior Member
 
TIM's Avatar
 
Posts: 4,632
Default

Phase 8
If you are able to keep the addiction in remission without an opioid supplement, you will use the cognitive tools you learned in treatment to deal with any lingering cravings. You will be able to recognize the precursors to a relapse and be armed with the techniques to intervene.

Stay vigilant looking for signs of heading toward relapse, stay involved with peer support, offer advice and use your experience to help others. http://www.addictionsurvivors.org/vb...splay.php?f=45
Congratulations!
__________________
A


Important disclaimer: Any information in this post is not and does not constitute medical advice under any circumstances. Addiction Survivors, Inc. does not warranty or guarantee the accurateness, completeness, adequacy or currency of the information contained in or linked to the Site. Your use of information on the Site or materials linked to the Site is entirely at your own risk. Voluntary Disclosure: Timothy L. is the President of The National Alliance of Advocates for Buprenorphine treatment. (NAABT.org) The views and opinions of Timothy L., or any poster, are not necessarily the views of AddictionSurvivors.org. NEVER take any online advice over that of a qualified healthcare provider Any information you read here should only serve to inspire you to investigate further with credible, verifiable referenced sources or your doctor.
TIM is offline   Reply With Quote
One User Says Thank You to TIM For This Useful Post:
Thank You (08-06-2011)
Unread 04-19-2010, 09:40 PM   #14
monsterkitty
Senior Member
 
Posts: 335
Default

This was a very interesting and helpful thread, I was wondering if it could be a sticky? I came across it when I clicked on someones name to find other posts by this person. I tried to find it again and I couldn't, I had to click on this persons name again and hunt for it that way. I could not find it in the 'Welcome Room'

Last edited by monsterkitty; 04-19-2010 at 09:50 PM..
monsterkitty is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 04-20-2010, 12:03 AM   #15
LKB1956
Senior Member
 
LKB1956's Avatar
 
Posts: 281
Default

I cant help you out with that one but maybe you can answer this. How did you come up with your screen name, Monsterkitty????? LOL LOL Linda
__________________
One day at a time, Linda
LKB1956 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 04-20-2010, 03:29 AM   #16
monsterkitty
Senior Member
 
Posts: 335
Default

Monsterkitty is my cats name. I wanted something I would remember easily, I guess I'm not so original with computer stuff. BTW, I let everyone know my cat is the FEARLESS monsterkitty, lol.

Thank you, Tim. I hope it will help other new people, and I will be able to refer back to it.
monsterkitty is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 04-20-2010, 11:22 AM   #17
TIM
Senior Member
 
TIM's Avatar
 
Posts: 4,632
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by monsterkitty View Post
This was a very interesting and helpful thread, I was wondering if it could be a sticky?
Thanks monsterkitty, I think making it a sticky is a good idea, there are not many places on the web where this information is available. I'm thinking of adding it to the NAABT educational site too.
Thanks,
Tim
__________________
A


Important disclaimer: Any information in this post is not and does not constitute medical advice under any circumstances. Addiction Survivors, Inc. does not warranty or guarantee the accurateness, completeness, adequacy or currency of the information contained in or linked to the Site. Your use of information on the Site or materials linked to the Site is entirely at your own risk. Voluntary Disclosure: Timothy L. is the President of The National Alliance of Advocates for Buprenorphine treatment. (NAABT.org) The views and opinions of Timothy L., or any poster, are not necessarily the views of AddictionSurvivors.org. NEVER take any online advice over that of a qualified healthcare provider Any information you read here should only serve to inspire you to investigate further with credible, verifiable referenced sources or your doctor.
TIM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 06-20-2011, 09:32 AM   #18
Bruceimanaddict
Member
 
Bruceimanaddict's Avatar
 
Posts: 77
Thumbs up Thanks!

Tim,

I just wanted to say thanks for this post. I'm in phase 5 right now and I know it doesn't matter how long it takes so I shouldn't be concerned with stopping taking my medication, but of course I want to get to Phase 8 one day. And I understand this all varies from person to person, but its still nice to see what kind of estimated time frame I am looking at.

I'm going to actually show this to my therapist this morning. I think it's something she could use to show other patients.

Thanks!
Bruce
__________________
One moment at a time...
Bruceimanaddict is offline   Reply With Quote
One User Says Thank You to Bruceimanaddict For This Useful Post:
Thank You (06-23-2011)
Unread 06-23-2011, 03:43 AM   #19
SuzyQz
Member
 
SuzyQz's Avatar
 
Posts: 42
Default this post is amazing!

I must say, I love this post and all the information. I start treatment Friday (yay) and I just posted on another thread about how scared I am and I don't know what to expect. I keep searching for what the first few days would be like and I couldn't find much. I was almost in tears from fear a few hours ago.. BUT now... I'm actually relieved. I'm even more excited and now DEFINITELY ready for Friday... Just gotta withdrawal now but it's going to be so worth it! Thank you SO much! Your post just probably helped me NOT cancel my appointment and keep on moving forward!! Thank you a million times!
Suzy
SuzyQz is offline   Reply With Quote
One User Says Thank You to SuzyQz For This Useful Post:
Thank You (06-23-2011)
Unread 08-06-2011, 05:51 PM   #20
deedle
Senior Member
 
deedle's Avatar
 
Posts: 419
Default

Thank you truly TIm. feeling a bit lost today, this post
really helped me make a plan.have a wonderful weekend
respectfully -d
__________________
Desiderata..strongwill.simple life.humble heart.always with respect -d
deedle is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 09-27-2011, 01:55 PM   #21
erictrucker
Junior Member
 
Posts: 9
Default Tim`s feedback

Thanks for info. You`re gonna like this. My second day on suboxone I said to myself; I dont need this medication. The `ole thought process of I can beat this. Like I said so many times before. Here it is: I want to be able to wake up, and not have to take anything.I guess I have to off my hi-horse and try to understand better an addiction. wow
erictrucker is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 06-02-2012, 09:31 PM   #22
erikanh80
Senior Member
 
Posts: 367
Default

Acceptance is such a big part of moving forward in treatment. I have been on sub for 21 months, and I like erictucker is saying above, just wanted that grasp on life where I could not need to take anything. Understanding the "why" of what made us begin treatment in the first place is incredibly helpful. For most of us, that "why" is because we accept that we cannot do this all alone, and that we surrender to receiving help & assistance with our path to sobriety/recovery. erictucker, its absolutely hard to mentally get off of that "high-horse" as you said, and just accept that we need help, and we are going to take that help. Our addiction plays these games in our brain that make us think we can just stop and we don't need help, that we can do it alone. But so many of us have tried this over & over and with the same result...that our addiction is just so damn powerful and its more powerful than we believe it to be. Its just part of the process....don't feel alone because I and many of us here have all had the same thoughts. I have had to remind myself so many times, that after all I have been through, all the money I have lost & hurt I've caused, the time I've put into this recovery process and how much I've spent on recovery...that after all of it, I need to keep going on the right path and do this right. I've come too far to try and give up having "help" now. I need the help. Its a constant theme that I have replayed in my mind...and it helps me to stay on target. Anyway...just wanted to say I've been there too,...you can do this, and we are lucky the "help" is available and we can access it, so take the help and keep telling yourself that you are worth it. Because you are!!
erikanh80 is offline   Reply With Quote
2 Users Say Thank You to erikanh80 For This Useful Post:
Thank You (04-02-2014), Thank You (03-30-2017)
Unread 07-17-2012, 11:51 AM   #23
trachtorch
Junior Member
 
Posts: 3
Default

Post moved to new thread for better visibility:

http://www.addictionsurvivors.org/vb...ad.php?t=27838
trachtorch is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 04-15-2013, 12:34 AM   #24
Babygirl09
Junior Member
 
Posts: 4
Default

This post has been really helpful. The doctor and counselor I see have just started to go over this stuff and I've been going there for a while. This post has shown me that I'm on the right track and have a little more work to do. Thanks!
Babygirl09 is offline   Reply With Quote
2 Users Say Thank You to Babygirl09 For This Useful Post:
Thank You (02-12-2014), Thank You (04-17-2013)
Unread 02-10-2014, 01:01 PM   #25
cdj
Member
 
Posts: 1
Default

I think sometimes the hardest part of treatment, and overcoming addiction, is finding something to look forward to and live for.

Often times we can get into depression when quitting. I've seen that a lot with others and myself. Sometimes it's hard to see a purpose in life, especially when you first start going through the detox process.

Thank you for this thread!
cdj is offline   Reply With Quote
2 Users Say Thank You to cdj For This Useful Post:
Thank You (04-02-2014), Thank You (02-10-2014)
Unread 05-30-2014, 09:00 AM   #26
Missjennie
Junior Member
 
Posts: 1
Default Support

I have come here because I really need some kind of help and support from somebody, anybody. I have been in the program for about a month now, and everything seems to be going ok, except for the fact that my fiancé doesn't take my addiction seriously, and says that it's all in my head, and addiction is not a disease, it's a state of mind, that can be over ridden if the person wanted it bad enough. He takes me to every one of my appointments, and on the way home, I have to listen to him go on and on about how stupid doctors have become, and that I'm just replacing one drug with another. I'm in this alone, and I just want to be understood. It was hard enough for me to ask for help, because I knew that instead of him being proud of me, he would just consider me weak. Every time I go to an appointment, I feel good about myself while I'm there, but by the time I get home, I feel totally ashamed of myself, and I don't know what to do about anything anymore. This was my first post. Thanks for being here to let me express myself without shame.
Missjennie is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 05-30-2014, 10:41 AM   #27
TIM
Senior Member
 
TIM's Avatar
 
Posts: 4,632
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Missjennie View Post
I have come here because I really need some kind of help and support from somebody, anybody. I have been in the program for about a month now, and everything seems to be going ok, except for the fact that my fiancé doesn't take my addiction seriously, and says that it's all in my head, and addiction is not a disease, it's a state of mind, that can be over ridden if the person wanted it bad enough. He takes me to every one of my appointments, and on the way home, I have to listen to him go on and on about how stupid doctors have become, and that I'm just replacing one drug with another. I'm in this alone, and I just want to be understood. It was hard enough for me to ask for help, because I knew that instead of him being proud of me, he would just consider me weak. Every time I go to an appointment, I feel good about myself while I'm there, but by the time I get home, I feel totally ashamed of myself, and I don't know what to do about anything anymore. This was my first post. Thanks for being here to let me express myself without shame.
Welcome to Addiction Survivors and congratulations on your first month of addiction remission!!

People like your fiancé (and myself at one time) see the problem as a taking drugs problem and believe that by simply stopping, the problem is solved. They believe that a relapse is a new bad choice. Since the body doesn’t get up on its own and seek drugs, people must be constantly making bad choices and choice isn’t a disease. After all, if someone put a gun to your head and said don’t take these drugs, you wouldn’t. So they think you don’t want it bad enough, don’t understand why drugs are bad, don’t see what drugs are doing to you and the people around you, and spend their time trying to show how bad things are and convince you to choose to stop. They believe treatment medications are just masking and prolonging the problem. Sadly, there are many drug counselors who believe this as well.

But where these people are wrong is that the problem isn’t taking drugs, that’s a symptom. The problem is the unnaturally strong cravings. It’s the cravings that negatively influence behavior and choice. Take away the drugs, and the cravings still remain. Put a gun to someone’s head or lock them in a cell, and the drug taking stops, but the cravings remain. These overwhelming ever-present cravings are the result of a malfunction in the brain, or said another way, a brain disease. It’s the cravings which need to be corrected. Lectures don’t correct the cause of the cravings, nor does punishment or guilt. What corrects the cravings is the same thing that caused them, repeated behavior. Repeating healthy behaviors which don’t include drugs, or reminders of drugs, slowly diminishes the craving-causing brain adaptations. But how do you replace the destructive behaviors with healthy ones long enough to take effect while experiencing constant cravings? That’s where buprenorphine comes in. It stops the cravings and allows you to correct the behavior and then gain experience with these healthy behaviors. It gives you time to deal with stress, depression, anxiety, relationships, finances, etc. so that after treatment these don’t trigger a relapse.

Once your fiancé understands that the problem is the biology causing the cravings, he can begin to understand it as a disease. The good news is you can prove your case if he's willing to listen. Here’s a paper that can be printed and hopefully you can get him to read, or at least look at: Neurobiology of addiction also this page describes the purpose of buprenorphine treatment: http://www.naabt.org/purpose_of_buprenorphine.cfm

It will take time, but if he's open to learning about your condition, you will get through to him. If he's not willing to learn about your condition...well try this first.

Tim


oh one more thing I just thought of, if he's unwilling to read, HBO put out a great documentary on addiction a few years ago. It explains some of what I mentioned above and might be a good way to at least get him exposed to an evidence-based view of addiction. http://www.hbo.com/addiction/thefilm...html?current=5
__________________
A


Important disclaimer: Any information in this post is not and does not constitute medical advice under any circumstances. Addiction Survivors, Inc. does not warranty or guarantee the accurateness, completeness, adequacy or currency of the information contained in or linked to the Site. Your use of information on the Site or materials linked to the Site is entirely at your own risk. Voluntary Disclosure: Timothy L. is the President of The National Alliance of Advocates for Buprenorphine treatment. (NAABT.org) The views and opinions of Timothy L., or any poster, are not necessarily the views of AddictionSurvivors.org. NEVER take any online advice over that of a qualified healthcare provider Any information you read here should only serve to inspire you to investigate further with credible, verifiable referenced sources or your doctor.
TIM is offline   Reply With Quote
2 Users Say Thank You to TIM For This Useful Post:
Thank You (04-08-2015), Thank You (09-20-2015)
Unread 10-18-2014, 08:34 PM   #28
eem
Junior Member
 
Posts: 24
Default

It's impossible for someone who hasn't experienced to understand. I was the same way before becoming an addict. There isn't anyway to make him understand. Sorry, but that's just the way it is with some people.
eem is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 12-20-2016, 08:13 PM   #29
pernicious_poppy
Junior Member
 
Posts: 3
Default

hi tim! first of all, thank you for this post-i actually came here looking for advice regarding the time period where you're learning how to live life again before tapering. the clinic i'm in has a strict 9-12 month treatment limit, after which, if you're not okay, you're basically SOL i suppose. i am approaching my 9-month anniversary, and i know i'm not ready. while i've made some pretty amazing improvements, i am a bit of a difficult case to treat-i've been regularly using opioids to deal with everyday life since age 17 (i'm 27 now), and am also a dual-diagnosis patient (having been diagnosed with bipolar, panic, and generalized anxiety disorders since my early teens-my mental illnesses actually far predate both diagnosis and any drug use in any capacity). i have not yet been able to return to work, and am still working on tweaking my medications to get the right combo to treat the bipolar and anxiety/panic, as well as an inherited sleep disorder. these illnesses were a large part of what drove my drug use to begin with, and they've made living a healthy, productive life-even without drugs-all but impossible. i feel as though i have a lot more work i need to do to both gain control over my mental illness and develop the coping skills and life fulfillment that i'll need to prevent myself from getting right back into the same place i was at the start of this year. but i have no idea how to proceed from here, and i am terrified, in all honesty, of the future. at the very least, i'd like to get well enough to keep a job before my insurance limit of 16 months suboxone coverage, so i'll have the resources to pay for my own until i'm able to say i'm well enough to taper safely. i don't mind being on the suboxone for several years, if that's what it takes-i just have to go back to the beginning of my adult life and start from scratch in developing proper life skills to ensure i'm healthy and won't turn back to opioids to numb the pain of mental illness, poverty, and lack of fulfillment in life. i'm scared, and i can't seem to find any info on this particular subject. any sort of advice, resources, etc. you or others may know of in regards to starting another therapy program after one has ended would be SO greatly appreciated. i'm afraid of what's gonna happen in a couple months if i don't.

best regards,
rae

EDITED:
To respond to rae's post, please go here:
http://addictionsurvivors.org/vbulle...ad.php?t=30534

Last edited by NancyB; 12-21-2016 at 06:41 AM.. Reason: Add link to new thread for responses
pernicious_poppy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off




All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:19 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
© 2014 Addiction Survivors